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UCSB LIBRARY



THE POEMS OF
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH




INTERIOR OF DOVE COTTAGE, GRASMEKE

FROM A UKAWING BY E. II. NEW



THE POEMS OF

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

EDITED

WITH AN INTRODUCTION
AND NOTES BY

NOWELL CHARLES SMITH, M.A.

LATE FELLOW OF NEW COLLEGE, AND FORMERLY
FELLOW OF MAGDALEN COLLEGE, OXFORD



IN THREE VOLUMES

VOL. Ill
WITH A FRONTISPIECE



METHUEN AND CO.

36 ESSEX STREET W.C.
LONDON



First Published in this Edition 1908



CONTENTS



EPITAPHS AND ELEGIAC PIECES

EPITAPHS TRANSLATED FROM CHIABRERA : PAOK

i. Weep not, beloved Friends ! nor let the air . 1

ii. Perhaps some needful service of the State . . 1

in. O thou who movest onward with a mind . . 2

iv. There never breathed a man who, when his life . 2

v. True is it that Ambrosio Salinero . . . 3

vi. Destined to war from very infancy .... 4

vii. O flower of all that springs from gentle blood . 4

vin. Not without heavy grief of heart did He . . 4

ix. Pause, courteous Spirit ! Baldi supplicates . . 5

I. By a blest Husband guided, Mary came ... 6

II. Six months to six years added he remained ... 6

HI. Cenotaph 6

IV. Epitaph 7

V. Address to the Scholars of the Village School of . 7

VI. Elegiac Stanzas 9

VII. To the Daisy 11

VIII. Elegiac Verses 13

IX. Sonnet 15

X. Lines 15

XI. Invocation to the Earth . 16

XII. Lines 17

XIII. Elegiac Stanzas 18

XIV. Elegiac Musings 19

XV. Written after the Death of Charles Lamb ... 21

XVI. Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg . 24

XVII. Inscription 26

ODE. INTIMATIONS OP IMMORTALITY FROM RECOLLECTIONS OF

EARLY CHILDHOOD ........ 26

THE EXCURSION

To the Right Honourable William, Earl of Lonsdale, E.G.,

etc. etc 32

Preface to the Edition of 1814 32



vi WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

PAGE

THE EXCURSION -continued

BOOK I. The Wanderer . . . . . . . 36

II. The Solitary 58

III. Despondency ....... 78

IV. Despondency Corrected .... . 100

V. The Pastor ... .130

VI. The Churchyard among the Mountains . . . 153

VII. The Churchyard among the Mountains (continued) . 180

VIII. The Parsonage 204

IX. Discourse of the Wanderer, and an Evening Visit to

the Lake 218

THE PRELUDE; OR, GROWTH OF A POET'S MIND

Advertisement 237

BOOK I. Introduction Childhood and School-time . . 238

II. School-time (continued) . . . . . . 252

. . III. Residence at Cambridge ...... 263

IV. Summer Vacation 277

V. Books . 287

,, VI. Cambridge and the Alps 301

,, VII. Residence in London . . . . . 318

,, VIII. Retrospect Love of Nature leading to Love of Man 335

IX. Residence in France ...... 350

,, X. Residence in France (continued) .... 363

XI. France (concluded) 377

,, XII. Imagination and Taste, how impaired and restored . 387
, . XIII. Imagination and Taste, how impaired and restored

(concluded) 395

XIV. Conclusion 403

POEMS NOT APPEARING IN THE EDITION OF 1849-50

Lines 414

Sonnet, on seeing Miss Helen Maria Williams weep at a Tale

of Distress 416

Sweet was the walk . . . . . . . 417

The Birth of Love . 417

The Convict 419

Andrew Jones 420

On Nature's invitation do I come 421

Bleak season was it, turbulent and bleak .... 422

Among all lovely things my love had been .... 422

The Tinker 423

Written in a Grotto 424



CONTENTS vii

PAOS

POEMS NOT APPEARING IN THE EDITION OF 1849-50
continued

The rains at length have ceased 425

Sonnet 425

Inscription for a Summer-house in the Orchard, Town-End,

Grasmere ......... 425

George and Sarah Green ....... 425

Through Cumbrian wilds, in many a mountain cave . . 426

My Son ! behold the Tide already spent .... 427

Translation of part of the First Book of the JEneid . . 427

The Scottish Broom on Bird-nest brae ..... 431

Placard for a Poll bearing an Old Shirt . 431

Sonnet 432

Critics, right honourable Bard .... . . . . 432

On Cain, a Mystery, dedicated to Sir Walter Scott . . 432
Composed when a probability existed of our being obliged to

quit Rydal Mount as a residence ..... 432

I, whose pretty Voice you hear 437

Written in the Strangers' Book at ' The Station,' opposite

Bowness ......... 438

To the Utilitarians ... .... 439

A Cento made by Wordsworth ...... 439

Squib ... 440

Epigram .......... 440

Translations

From Michelangelo 441

The Same .......... 441

From the Latin of Thomas Warton ..... 441

Translation of Tasso's Sonnet ...... 441

Translation of the Athenian Song in honour of Harmodius

and Aristogiton 442

Inscription on a Rock at Rydal Mount ..... 443

Protest against the Ballot 443

A Poet to his Grandchild 443

On a Portrait of Isabella Fenwick painted by Margaret Gillies 444

To I. F 444

Oh Bounty without measure, while the Grace . . . 445

When Severn's sweeping Flood had overthrown . . . 445

The Eagle and the Dove 445

Lines 446

Ode on the Installation of His Royal Highness Prince Albert

as Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, July 6,

1847 447



viii WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

FA.OE

APPENDIX: POEMS OF 1793

An Evening Walk 460

Descriptive Sketches 462

APPENDIX, PREFACES, ETC.

Preface to the Second Edition of Lyrical Ballads . . . 484

Appendix 498

Essay, Supplementary to the Preface 501

Dedication prefixed to the Edition of 1815 .... 518

Preface to the Edition of 1815 519

Postscript. 1835 528

NOTES 643

INDEX OF FIRST LINES 589

INDEX OF TITLES . 606






EPITAPHS AND ELEGIAC PIECES
EPITAPHS

TRANSLATED FROM CHIABRERA



WEEP not, beloved Friends ! nor let the air
For me with sighs be troubled. Not from life
Have I been taken ; this is genuine life
And this alone the life which now I live
In peace eternal; where desire and joy
Together move in fellowship without end.
Francesco Ceni willed that, after death,
His tombstone thus should speak for him. And surely
Small cause there is for that fond wish of ours
Long to continue in this world ; a world 10

That keeps not faith, nor yet can point a hope
To good, whereof itself is destitute.

Published 1837

II

PERHAPS some needful service of the State
Drew TITUS from the depth of studious bowers,
And doomed him to contend in faithless courts,
Where gold determines between right and wrong.
Yet did at length his loyalty of heart,
And his pure native genius, lead him back
To wait upon the bright and gracious Muses,
Whom he had early loved. And not in vain
Such course he held ! Bologna's learned schools
Were gladdened by the Sage's voice, and hung ic

With fondness on those sweet Nestorian strains.
There pleasure crowned his days ; and all his thoughts
A roseate fragrance breathed. 1 O human life,
That never art secure from dolorous change !

1 Ivi vivea giocondo c i suoi pensieri

Krano tutti rose.

The Translator had not skill to come nearer to his original.
3-A



WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

Behold a high injunction suddenly

To Arno's side hath brought him, and he charmed

A Tuscan audience : but full soon was called

To the perpetual silence of the grave.

Mourn, Italy, the loss of him who stood

A Champion steadfast and invincible,

To quell the rage of literary War !

1809



III

OTHOU who movest onward with a mind
Intent upon thy way, pause, though in haste !
'Twill be no fruitless moment. I was born
Within Savona's walls, of gentle blood.
On Tiber's banks my youth was dedicate
To sacred studies ; and the Roman Shepherd
Gave to my charge Urbino's numerous flock.
Well did I watch, much laboured, nor had power
To escape from many and strange indignities ;
Was smitten by the great ones of the world,
But did not fall ; for Virtue braves all shocks,
Upon herself resting immoveably.
Me did a kindlier fortune then invite
To serve the glorious Henry, King of France,
And in his hands I saw a high reward
Stretched out for my acceptance, but Death came.
Now, Reader, learn from this my fate, how false,
How treacherous to her promise, is the world ;
And trust in God to whose eternal doom
Must bend the sceptred Potentates of earth. :

1809



IV

I HERE never breathed a man who, when his life
Was closing, might not of that life relate
long and hard. The warrior will report
Of wounds, and bright swords flashing in the field,
And blast of trumpets. He who hath been doomed
To bow his forehead in the courts of kings,
Will tell of fraud and never-ceasing hate,
Envy and heart-inquietude, derived
From intricate cabals of treacherous friends.
I, who on shipboard lived from earliest youth, i

Could represent the countenance horrible
Of the vexed waters, and the indignant rage



EPITAPHS 8

Of Auster and Bootes. Fifty years

Over the well-steered galleys did I rule :

From huge Pelorus to the Atlantic pillars,

Rises no mountain to mine eyes unknown ;

And the broad gulfs I traversed oft and oft.

Of every cloud which in the heavens might stir

I knew the force ; and hence the rough sea's pride

Availed not to my Vessel's overthrow. 20

What noble pomp and frequent have not I

On regal decks beheld ! yet in the end

I learned that one poor moment can suffice

To equalise the lofty and the low.

We sail the sea of life a Calm One finds,

And One a Tempest and, the voyage o'er,

Death is the quiet haven of us all.

If more of my condition ye would know,

Savona was my birthplace, and I sprang

Of noble parents : seventy years and three 30

Lived I then yielded to a slow disease.

1809



TRUE is it that Ambrosio Salinero
With an untoward fate was long involved
In odious litigation ; and full long,
Fate harder still ! had he to endure assaults
Of racking malady. And true it is
That not the less a frank courageous heart
And buoyant spirit triumphed over pain ;
And he was strong to follow in the steps
Of the fair Muses. Not a covert path
Leads to the dear Parnassian forest's shade, 10

That might from him be hidden ; not a track
Mounts to pellucid Hippocrene, but he
Had traced its windings. This Savona knows,
Yet no sepulchral honours to her Son
She paid, for in our age the heart is ruled
Only by gold. And now a simple stone
Inscribed with this memorial here is raised
By his bereft, his lonely, Chiabrera.
Think not, O Passenger ! who read'st the lines
That an exceeding love hath dazzled me ; 20

No he was One whose memory ought to spread
Where'er Permessus bears an honoured name,
And live as long as its pure stream shall flow.

Published 1837



WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

VI

BESTINED to war from very infancy
Was I, Roberto Dati, and I took
alta the white symbol of the Cross :
Nor in life's vigorous season did I shun
Hazard or toil ; among the sands was seen
Of Lybia ; and not seldom, on the banks
Of wide Hungarian Danube, 'twas my lot
To hear the sanguinary trumpet sounded.
So lived I, and repined not at such fate :
This only grieves me, for it seems a wrong, 10

That stripped of arms I to my end am brought
On the soft down of my paternal home.
Yet haply Arno shall be spared all cause
To blush for me. Thou, loiter not nor halt
In thy appointed way, and bear in mind
How fleeting and how frail is human life !

1809

VII

O FLOWER of all that springs from gentle blood,
And all that generous nurture breeds to make
Youth amiable ; O friend so true of soul
To fair Aglaia ; by what envy moved,
Lelius ! has death cut short thy brilliant day
In its sweet opening ? and what dire mishap
Has from Savona torn her best delight ?
For thee she mourns, nor e'er will cease to mourn ;
And, should the out-pourings of her eyes suffice not
For her heart's grief, she will entreat Sebeto 10

Not to withhold his bounteous aid, Sebeto
Who saw thee, on his margin, yield to death,
In the chaste arms of thy beloved Love !
What profit riches ? what does youth avail ?
Dust are our hopes ; I, weeping bitterly,
Penned these sad lines, nor can forbear to pray
That every gentle Spirit hither led
May read them not without some bitter tears.

Published 1837

VIII

"XT OT without heavy grief of heart did He
[ \ On whom the duty fell (for at that time
The father sojourned in a distant land)
Deposit in the hollow of this tomb
A brother's Child, most tenderly beloved !
FRANCESCO was the name the Youth had borne,



EPITAPHS

POZZOBONNELLI his illustrious house ;

And, when beneath this stone the Corse was laid,

The eyes of all Savona streamed with tears.

Alas ! the twentieth April of his life

Had scarcely flowered : and at this early time,

By genuine virtue he inspired a hope

That greatly cheered his country : to his kin

He promised comfort ; and the flattering thoughts

His friends had in their fondness entertained, 1

He suffered not to languish or decay.

Now is there not good reason to break forth

Into a passionate lament? O Soul!

Short while a Pilgrim in our nether world,

Do thou enjoy the calm empyreal air ;

And round this earthly tomb let roses rise,

An everlasting spring ! in memory

Of that delightful fragrance which was once

From thy mild manners quietly exhaled.

1809



IX

PAUSE, courteous Spirit ! Baldi supplicates
That Thou, with no reluctant voice, for him
Here laid in mortal darkness, wouldst prefer
A prayer to the Redeemer of the world.
This to the dead by sacred right belongs ;
All else is nothing. Did occasion suit
To tell his worth, the marble of this tomb
Would ill suffice : for Plato's lore sublime,
And all the wisdom of the Stagyrite,
Enriched and beautified his studious mind :
With Archimedes also he conversed
As with a chosen friend ; nor did he leave
Those laureat wreaths ungathered which the Nymphs
Twine near their loved Permessus. Finally,
Himself above each lower thought uplifting,
His ears he closed to listen to the songs
Which Sion's Kings did consecrate of old ;
And his Permessus found on Lebanon.
A blessed Man ! who of protracted days
Made not, as thousands do, a vulgar sleep ; :

But truly did He live his life. Urbino,
Take pride in him ! O Passenger, farewell !

1809
1 In justice to the Author, I subjoin the original :

e dcgli amici
Non lasciava languire i bei pensieri.



6 WILLIAM WORDSWORTH



i Y a blest Husband guided, Mary came

From nearest kindred, Vernon her new name ;
SKe came, though meek of soul, in seemly pride
Of happiness and hope, a youthful Bride.
O dread reverse ! if aught be so, which proves
That God will chasten whom he dearly loves.
Faith bore her up through pains in mercy given,
And troubles that were each a step to Heaven :
Two Babes were laid in earth before she died ;
A third now slumbers at the Mother's side ; 10

Its Sister-twin survives, whose smiles afford
A trembling solace to her widowed Lord.

Reader ! if to thy bosom cling the pain
Of recent sorrow combated in vain ;
Or if thy cherished grief have failed to thwart
Time still intent on his insidious part,
Lulling the mourner's best good thoughts asleep,
Pilfering regrets we would, but cannot, keep ;
Bear with Him judge Him gently who makes known
His bitter loss by this memorial Stone ; 20

And pray that in his faithful breast the grace
Of resignation find a hallowed place.

Published 1835

II

SIX months to six years added he remained
Upon this sinful earth, by sin unstained :
O blessed Lord ! whose mercy then removed
A Child whom every eye that looked on loved ;
Support us, teach us calmly to resign
What we possessed, and now is wholly thine !

Published 1837

III
CENOTAPH

IN affectionate remembrance of Frances Fermor, whose remains are deposited
in the church of Claines, near Worcester, this stone is erected by her sister,
Dame Margaret, wife of Sir George Beaumont, Bart., who, feeling not less
than the lore of a brother for the deceased, commends this memorial to the
care of his heirs and successors in the possession of this place.

Y vain affections unenthralled,

Though resolute when duty called
To meet the world's broad eye,
Pure as the holiest cloistered nun



ADDRESS TO SCHOLARS

That ever feared the tempting sun,

Did Fermor live and die.

This Tablet, hallowed by her name,

One heart-relieving tear may claim ;

But if the pensive gloom

Of fond regret be still thy choice,

Exalt thy spirit, hear the voice

Of Jesus from her tomb !

I AM THE WAY, THE TRUTH, AND THE LIFE.'

1824



IN THE CHAPEL-YARD OF LANGDALE, WESTMORELAND

BY playful smiles, (alas ! too oft
A sad heart's sunshine) by a soft
And gentle nature, and a free
Yet modest hand of charity,
Through life was OWEN LLOYD endeared
To young and old ; and how revered
Had been that pious spirit, a tide
Of humble mourners testified,
When, after pains dispensed to prove
The measure of God's chastening love,
Here, brought from far, his corse found rest,
Fulfilment of his own request ;
Urged less for this Yew's shade, though he
Planted with such fond hope the tree ;
Less for the love of stream and rock,
Dear as they were, than that his Flock,
When they no more their Pastor's voice
Could hear to guide them in their choice
Through good and evil, help might have,
Admonished, from his silent grave,
Of righteousness, of sins forgiven,
For peace on earth and bliss in heaven.

1841

V

ADDRESS TO THE SCHOLARS OF THE
VILLAGE SCHOOL OF

1798

I COME, ye little noisy Crew,
Not long your pastime to prevent ;
heard the blessing which to you



WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

Our common Friend and Father sent.

I kissed his cheek before he died ;

And when his breath was fled,

I raised, while kneeling by his side,

His hand : it dropped like lead.

Your hands, dear Little-ones, do all

That can be done, will never fall 10

Like his till they are dead.

By night or day, blow foul or fair,

Ne'er will the best of all your train

Play with the locks of his white hair,

Or stand between his knees again.

Here did he sit confined for hours ;
But he could see the woods and plains,
Could hear the wind and mark the showers
Come streaming down the streaming panes.
Now stretched beneath his grass-green mound 20
He rests a prisoner of the ground.
He loved the breathing air,
He loved the sun, but if it rise
Or set, to him where now he lies,
Brings not a moment's care.
Alas ! what idle words ; but take
The Dirge which for our Master's sake
And yours, love prompted me to make.
The rhymes so homely in attire
With learned ears may ill agree, 30

But chanted by your Orphan Quire
Will make a touching melody.



DIRGE

MOURN, Shepherd, near thy old grey stone ;
Thou Angler, by the silent flood ;
And mourn when thou art all alone,
Thou Woodman, in the distant wood !

Thou one blind Sailor, rich in joy

Though blind, thy tunes in sadness hum ;

And mourn, thou poor half-witted Boy !

Born deaf, and living deaf and dumb. 40

Thou drooping sick Man, bless the Guide
Who checked or turned thy headstrong youth,
As he before had sanctified
Thy infancy with heavenly truth.



ELEGIAC STANZAS 9

Ye Striplings, light of heart and gay,

Bold settlers on some foreign shore,

Give, when your thoughts are turned this way,

A sigh to him whom we deplore.

For us who here in funeral strain

With one accord our voices raise, 50

Let sorrow overcharged with pain

Be lost in thankfulness and praise.

And when our hearts shall feel a sting
From ill we meet or good we miss,
May touches of his memory bring
Fond healing, like a mother's kiss.

BY THE SIDE OF THE GRAVE SOME YEARS AFTER

LONG time his pulse hath ceased to beat ;

But benefits, his gift, we trace

Expressed in every eye we meet

Round this dear Vale, his native place. 60

To stately Hall and Cottage rude
Flowed from his life what still they hold,
Light pleasures, every day renewed ;
And blessings half a century old.

Oh true of heart, of spirit gay,
Thy faults, where not already gone
From memory, prolong their stay
For charity's sweet sake alone.

Such solace find we for our loss ;

And what beyond this thought we crave 70

Comes in the promise from the Cross,

Shining upon thy happy grave. 1

1798

VI
ELEGIAC STANZAS

SUGGESTED BY A PICTURE OF PEELE CASTLE IN A STORM,
PAINTED BY SIR GEORGE BEAUMONT

I WAS thy neighbour once, thou rugged Pile !
Four summer weeks I dwelt in sight of thee :
I saw thee every day ; and all the while
Thy Form was sleeping on a glassy sea.

1 See upon the subject of the three foregoing pieces, the ' Matthew ' poema,
vol. ii., pp. 337 foil.



10 WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

So pure the sky, so quiet was the air!
So like, so very like, was day to day !
Whene'er I looked, thy Image still was there ;
It trembled, but it never passed away.

How perfect was the calm ! it seemed no sleep ;

No mood, which season takes away, or brings : 10

I could have fancied that the mighty Deep

Was even the gentlest of all gentle Things.

Ah ! THEN, if mine had been the Painter's hand,
To express what then I saw ; and add the gleam,
The light that never was, on sea or land,
The consecration, and the Poet's dream ;

I would have planted thee, thou hoary Pile

Amid a world how different from this !

Beside a sea that could not cease to smile ;

On tranquil land, beneath a sky of bliss. 20

Thou shouldst have seemed a treasure-house divine
Of peaceful years ; a chronicle of heaven ;
Of all the sunbeams that did ever shine
The very sweetest had to thee been given.

A Picture had it been of lasting ease,
Elysian quiet, without toil or strife ;
No motion but the moving tide, a breeze,
Or merely silent Nature's breathing life.

Such, in the fond illusion of my heart,

Such Picture would I at that time have made : 30

And seen the soul of truth in every part,

A steadfast peace that might not be betrayed.

So once it would have been, 'tis so no more ;
I have submitted to a new control :
A power is gone, which nothing can restore ;
A deep distress hath humanised my Soul.

Not for a moment could I now behold

A smiling sea, and be what I have been :

The feeling of my loss will ne'er be old ;

This, which I know, I speak with mind serene. 40

Then, Beaumont, Friend ! who would have been the

Friend,

If he had lived, of Him whom I deplore,
This work of thine I blame not, but commend ;
This sea in anger, and that dismal shore.



TO THE DAISY 11

'tis a passionate Work ! yet wise and well,
Well chosen is the spirit that is here ;

That Hulk which labours in the deadly swell,
This rueful sky, this pageantry of fear !

And this huge Castle, standing here sublime,

1 love to see the look with which it braves, 50
Cased in the unfeeling armour of old time,

The lightning, the fierce wind, and trampling waves.

Farewell, farewell the heart that lives alone,
Housed in a dream, at distance from the Kind !
Such happiness, wherever it be known,
Is to be pitied ; for 'tis surely blind.

But welcome fortitude, and patient cheer,

And frequent sights of what is to be borne !

Such sights, or worse, as are before me here.

Not without hope we suffer and we mourn. 60

1805



VII
TO THE DAISY

SWEET Flower ! belike one day to have
A place upon thy Poet's grave,
I welcome thee once more :
But He, who was on land, at sea,
My Brother, too, in loving thee,
Although he loved more silently,
Sleeps by his native shore.

Ah ! hopeful, hopeful was the day

When to that Ship he bent his way,

To govern and to guide :

His wish was gained : a little time

Would bring him back in manhood's prime

And free for life, these hills to climb,

With all his wants supplied.

And full of hope day followed day

While that stout Ship at anchor lay

Beside the shores of Wight ;

The May had then made all things green ;

And, floating there, in pomp serene,

That Ship was goodly to be seen,

His pride and his delight!



12 WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

Yet then, when called ashore, he sought
The tender peace of rural thought :
In more than happy mood
To your abodes, bright daisy Flowers !
He then would steal at leisure hours,
And loved you glittering in your bowers,
A starry multitude.

But hark the word ! the ship is gone ;

Returns from her long course : anon 30

Sets sail : in season due,

Once more on English earth they stand :

But, when a third time from the land

They parted, sorrow was at hand

For Him and for his crew.

Ill-fated Vessel ! ghastly shock !

At length delivered from the rock,

The deep she hath regained ;

And through the stormy night they steer ;

Labouring for life, in hope and fear, 40

To reach a safer shore how near,

Yet not to be attained !

' Silence ! ' the brave Commander cried ;
To that calm word a shriek replied,
It was the last death-shriek.
A few (my soul oft sees that sight)
Survive upon the tall mast's height ;
But one dear remnant of the night
For Him in vain I seek.

Six weeks beneath the moving sea 50

He lay in slumber quietly ;

Unforced by wind or wave

To quit the Ship for which he died,

(All claims of duty satisfied ;)



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