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better employment opportunities. In addition, birth rates for
the county and state dropped considerably during this period.

In 1940-1950 Wilson's rate of growth exceeded all other
comparative units. Note, however, that during this period
Wilson City rate of growth declined substantially more than
the county even though it exceeded it in terms of rate of
growth. Again, the state's rate of growth increased.

The decline of the growth rate of Wilson and Wilson County
can be attributed to the beginning of World War II. The war
effort placed a heavy burden on the younger population, partic-
ularly the men eligible for military service. As a result they
were drained from the community. The middle age population
migrated to the large cities where employment opportunities were
plentiful due to the high demand for war materials.

During 1950 and 1960, Wilson City's rate of growth was
slightly higher than that of the other comparative units.
Table 7 indicates that Wilson City was the only unit showing
an increase from the previous decade.

The primary reason for the substantial increase for
Wilson's population during this period is due mainly to in-
migration of the rural population into Wilson. On the other
hand, both the county and the state's rate of growth declined
somewhat from the previous decade. This pattern indicates
that out-migration was comparatively high for both units. The



1 3



state experienced an out-migration from both its rural and urban
area.

Wilson Growth Compared with Neighboring Cities

Table 8 shows population by decade among five of the major
cities in Eastern North Carolina. The population changes are
also graphically portrayed in Figure 3. It is evident that the
general trend of population among the five cities is one of
increase at a decreasing rate, as the rate of growth has slowed
down considerably from the sharp upward surges of 1900-1910.
Note that Wilson's growth has fluctuated considerably, with
large gains in some decades, particularly between 1930 and
1940 and again between 1950 and 1960.

As shown in Table 9, out of the five major cities, Rocky
Mount has experienced the greatest increase in population
during the last sixty years; however, note that most of its
growth took place in the early part of the century. Since
1930 Rocky Mount's population has increased, but at a decreasing
rate. Wilson and Greenville grew at a faster rate than any
of the other three eastern cities between 1930 and 1960. It is
interesting to notice that Greenville and Wilson had almost
identical rates of growth between 1930 and 1950,

The 1960 Census show that Goldsboro, Kinston and Greenville
had much larger increases then both Wilson and Rocky Mount. In
the previous study, it was pointed out that the higher rate of
growth was to be expected for Kinston and Goldsboro. This is
due primarily to the location of the DuPont Plant in the
Kinston area and the reactivation of Seymour - Johnson Air
Force Base in Goldsboro.



14



TABLE 8. POPULATION OF FIVE EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA CITIES

BY DECADE, FROM 1900 TO 1960

City 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960

Wilson 3,525 6,717 10,612 12,613 19,234 23,010 28,753

Rocky Mount 2,937 8,051 12,742 21,412 25,568 27,697 32,147

Goldsboro 5,877 6,107 11,296 14,985 17,274 21,454 28,873

Kinston 4,106 6,995 9,771 11,362 15,388 18,336 24,819

Greenville 2,565 4,101 5,772 9,194 12,674 16,724 22,860



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, I960,



TABLE 9. PERCENT INCREASE IN POPULATION FOR FIVE EASTERN NORTH
CAROLINA CITIES - 1900-1960, 1900-1930, 1930-1950,
1950-1960.





Percent


Percent


Percent


Percent


City


1900-1960


1900-1930


1930-1950


1950-1960


Wilson


715.7


257 .8


82.4


25.0


Rocky Mount


994.6


629.0


29.4


16. 1


Goldsboro


391.3


155.0


43.2


34.6


Kinston


504.5


176.7


61.4


35.4


G r eenvi lie


791.2


258.4


81.9


36.7



Note: The percentage shown represents the increase in population
during the preceding decade, expressed as percent of the
population at the start of the decade.

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census.



O -^ O -H u

a 3 o :»i o



h n n >J in







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16'



North Carolina S*a»« Library
Raleigh

ESTIMATED 1966 POPULATION
Wilson 33,627 Wilson Township 37,180 Wilson County 58,845

The above estimates were obtained by using the Cohort-Survival
method which is recommended as the most reliable one when pro-
jections of present or future population are made. This method
simply adjusts figures from the last census forwarded by age
groups and by sex groups on a year to year basis to the date of
the forecast with separate adjustment made for each of three
major components of population change: deaths, births and net
migration. This method also records the change in population
by five year intervals, using a fertility ratio to fill in data
for new persons appearing in 0-4 years age group.

In order to confirm the estimates obtained through the Cohort-
Survival method, three indicators were also used in estimating
the current population of Wilson. These indicators are: trends
based on preceding decades, utility meter connections and new
residential structures. The methodology and estimates are
discussed in the following section. These estimates are not
the recommended estimates for this report, but have been in-
cluded in this section primarily to confirm the Cohort-Survival
est ima t es .

Based Upon the Preceding Decade

The 1966 estimates were obtained by using the average change
per year between 1950 and 1960 census. The estimate revealed
a population of 31,495 for Wilson in 1966. This is a con-
servative estimate as other methods of measurement indicate that
the figure might be somewhat higher.

Based Upon the Number of Residential Electric Meters

As of July, 1966 the following number of electric meters
were within the corporate limits of the City:



Residential Meters
Commercial Meters
Industrial Meters
Tota 1



9,141
1,229

79

10,449



In 1960, the average number of persons per dwelling was
3.5. Assuming that each residential electric meter represents
one dwelling unit, the July, 1966 population is then estimated
by multiplying the number of meters by 3.5. This produces an
estimated population of 31,993. This method as well as previous
methods reveals a low estimate. It is impossible to estimate
the population of the Wilson Planning Area based on a meter count
because the Wilson Power Company serves large parts of the
county within a radius of approximately ten miles.

Based Upon Number of New Residential Units From 1960-1966

As of July 1966, the Wilson Building Inspection Department's
records showed that there were 936 new residential units con-
structed in what were the 1960 corporate limits. As of 1960,
using the Land Use Survey count, 352 new dwellings were
accounted for in newly annexed areas in the western part of
Wilson. Of the 352 units, 268 (Building Inspection records)
were constructed while the remaining were existing structures
already in the area annexed. Taking into account what is now
the present corporate limits, the total number of new units
amount to 1,388. Between 1960 and 1966, there were 60 residen-
tial units demolished in the corporate limits of Wilson.

The July 1966 population is obtained by multiplying the
number of new residential units (less the number of units
demolished) by the average household size which is 3.5 persons
per dwelling unit. This shows a gain of 4,298 people for Wilson.
Adding this figure to 28,573 enumerated in 1960 gives an estimate
of 33,051 within the present corporate limits.



18



FUTURE POPULATION

In forecasting population for Wilson City, it is assumed
that past trends will continue in effect throughout the planning
period and that no major wars, changes in birth rates or other
major departures from the past trends will take place. The
future population of Wilson City, Wilson Township and Wilson
County are shown below in Table 10.



TABLE 10. FUTURE POPULATION OF WILSON CITY, WILSON TOWNSHIP
AND WILSON COUNTY, 1960-1985



Year



1960


1966


1970


1980


1985



Wi lson City

28, 753
33,627
36, 591
47 ,287
53,718



Wilson
Townsh ip

33, 768
37, 180
39, 454
50, 739
57, 639



Wilson
County

57,716
58,845
59,498
61,033
61,867



AMOUNT OF CHANGE OF FUTURE POPULATION
Wilson City Wilson Township Wilson County



Percent
Number Change



1960







- -


-


1966


4.


,814


16,


,7


1970


2.


,964


8,


.8


1980


10,


, 696


29,


.2


1985


6.


,43 1


13,


.6


Projected










Growth


24,


,965


86,


.8



Percent
Number Change



3,412

2,274

11,285

6,900

23,871



10. 1

6.1

28,6

13.6

70.6



Percent
Numb er Change



1, 129
753

1 ,43 5
834

4, 151



2.0
1.3
2.4
1.4

7. 1



Table 10 indicates that Wilson City's and Wilson Township's
population is projected to increase enormously between 1960-1985.
Wilson City's population is expected to increase by 24,965 persons



or 86.8 percent; Wilson Township 24,871 persons or 70.6 percent
while Wilson County is only projected to increase by 4,151
persons or 7.1 percent. The Wilson Township will increase in
number less than Wilson because the city will more than likely
absorb the township population through annexation. Obviously,
the majority of the county growth will take place in Wilson
City and Wilson Township.

This pattern indicates that Wilson City will continue to
experience a substantial in-migration of population particular-
ly from the rural areas and smaller towns within the immediate
areas. The Wilson Township projected growth will be due primarily
to the urban influence of Wilson City which is reflected in its
total projected growth. Wilson County's slight increase during
the projected period indicates that for the most part, out-
migration of the rural farm population will continue either
to the larger cities within the state or even outside of the
state.



2



CHARACTERISTICS OF THE POPULATION IN
WILSON CITY AND WILSON COUNTY



Before commencing with the analysis of the population
changes, it is essential to outline in summary form the
population characteristics of Wilson City and Wilson County
by age, race and sex. Wilson Township population character-
istics are not included because the U. S. Bureau of the Census
did not publish this data for townships.

One can view the population age distribution of both
Wilson City and Wilson County in terms of the following five
categories: Preschool, School Age, Young Productive, Established
Productive and the Retired Citizens.

Table 11 outlines the characteristics of both Wilson City
and Wilson County by major age group, sex and racial character-
istics. Detailed population characteristics are found in
Append ix A .

TABLE 11. SUMMARY OF WILSON CITY AND WILSON COUNTY
POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS, 1960



Major Age Groups



Ca t egory

Preschool
(0-5)

School Age
(5-14)

Young Productive
(15-34)

Established

P roduc t ive

(35-64)

Retired Citizens
(65+)

Tota 1



Wilson


City




W i 1 son


County




P ercent




Percent


Numb er


of


Tota 1


Numb e r


of Total


3 ,220




11 .2


6,673


11.6


6,063




21.1


13,557


23.5


8,478




29.5


16,422


28.5



8,973


31.2


17,418


30.2


2,019


7 .0


3 ,646


6.2


28,753


100.0


57,716


100.0



- 21



TABLE 11



Cont inued



Sex Characteristics



S ex

Male
Fema 1 e

Tota 1



Wilson


City




Percent


Number


of Total


13, 579


47.2


15,174


52.8


28,753


100.0



Wilson County
Numb er



Percent
of Total



28,045 48.6
29,671 51.4
57,716 100.0



Racial Characteristics



Ra ce

White
Non-White
Tota 1



Wilson


City


Wilson


County




Percent




Percent


Number


of Total


Numb er


of Total


17,452


60.7


34,498


59.8


11,301


39.3


23,218


40.2


28,753


100.0


57,716


100.0



S our ce : U ,



Sureau of the Census.



- 22



DISTRIBUTION PATTERNS

The primary purpose of this section is to show the pro-
portionate as well as numerical and percent changes of the
population by age, race and sex in Wilson City and Wilson County
between 1950 and 1960. In order to illustrate these changes the
population has been combined into five major age groupings by
sex and race. The proportionate changes should not be inter-
preted as growth in that they only relate to the changes that
occur in relation to the total population.

In the following section only the numerical and percent
change of population will be discussed as it is of utmost
importance to know where and how much growth has taken place
between 1950 and 1960.

Wilson City's Male Population - White and Non-White

As shown in Table 12, the white male population increased
numerically by 1919 persons or 30 percent between 1950 and 1960.
Within the white male population all age groups grew; however,
the percent increase was much higher among the retired citizens,
school age, and preschool groups.

The non-white male population increased by 720 persons or
15.8 percent between 1950 and 1960. All age groups grew, with
the exception of the young productive group. This group de-
creased by 127 persons or 9.3 percent. The most outstanding
percent increases were for the school age and retired groups.



Wilson City's Female Population - White and Non-White

As shown in Tables 14 and 15, the female's growth pattern
is similar to that of the male population. The white female
increased numerically by 2,239 persons or 32.4 percent between
1950 and 1960. Within these age groups the largest percent
gains are for the school age, established productive, and
retired citizens. Among the white female population, all
age groups grew.

- 23 -



TABLE 12. DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE MALE POPULATION
IN WILSON CITY - 1950-1960



Ca t egory

Preschool
(-5)

School Age

(5-14)

Young Productive
(15-34)

Established Productive
(35-64)

Retired
(45+)



1950




Number


P,


ETcent


708




11.2


975




15.2


2 ,348




36.7


2,056




32.2


303




4.7



1960




Number


P


sr c en t


928




11.1


1 , 609




19.4


2,653




32.0


2,640




3 1.7


i-Q




5.8



6.390 100.0



309 100.0



Number and

Percent Increase

1950-1960


Number


I'


3 re en t


2 2'!




31.1


634




65.0


305




13.0


584




28.4


176




58. 1


1,919




30.0



Source: These statistics were compiled from detailed characteristics included
in the Appendix.



TABLE 13. DISTRIBUTION OF THE NON-WHITE MALE POPULATION
IN WILSON CITY - 1950-1960



Category

Preschool
(-5)

School Age
(5-14)

Young Productive
(15-34)

Established Productive 1,396
(35-64)

Retired
(65 + )



648


14.2


915


20. 2


1,363


29.9


1,396


30.7


228


5.0


4, 550


100.0





1960




Nu


mber


r


er c en t




726




13.8


1


, 435




27.3


1


, 236




23.3


1


, 533




29.2




340




6.4




,270




100.0



Numb

Percent

1950


er and

Increase
-1960


Number


Pi


?rcent


78




12.0


520




56.8


- 127




- 9.3


137




9.8


112




49. 1


720




15.8



Source: These statistics were compiled from the detailed characteristics
included in the Appendix.



-24-



TABLE 14. DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE FEMALE POPULATION
IN WILSON CITY - 1950-1960



Category

Preschoo 1
(-5)

School Age
(5-14)

Yoi/ng Productive
(15-34)

Established Productive 2,247 32.6
(35-64)



1950
Number Percent
671 9.7

1,005 14.6

2, 544 36. 7



Ret ired
(6 5+)



437 6.4
6. 904 100.0



1960

Numb er Percent

847 9.2

1 , 542 17.1

3.055 33.6

2, 952 31.9

747 8.2

9, 143 100.0



Numb.

Percent

1950-


; r and

Increase
-1960


Number


P


er c en t


176




26.2


537




53.4


511




20. 1


705




31.4


310




70. 9


2,239




32.4



Source: These statistics were compiled from the detailed characteristics
included in the Appendix.



TABLE 15. DISTRIBUTION OF THE NON-WHITE FEMALE POPULATION
IN WILSON CITY - 1950-1960



Category

Preschool
(-5)

School Age

(5-14)

Young Productive
(15-34)

Established Product!
(35-64)

Ret ired
(65 + )





1950




Nu


mber


t


e r c en t




661




12.8




930




18.0


1


,711




33.1


1


, 590




30.8




274




5.3



5, 166 100.0



1960




Number


P


e r c en t


719




11.9


1,477




24. 5


1, 534




25.4


1 ,848




30. 7


453




7.5


6,031




100.0



Number and

Percent Increase

1950-1960

Number Percent

58 8.8

547 58.8

-177 -10.3

258 16.2

179 65.3

857 16.7



Source: These statistics were compiled fi
included in the Appendix.



the detailed characteristics



■25-



Table 15 indicates that the non-white female population
increased by 857 persons or 16.7 percent between 1950 and 1960.
Within the non-white female population the only group that
did not show a percent gain was the young productive group.
Note that the largest gains were in the school age and retired
groups .

Wilson County's Male Population - White and Non-White

In Wilson County, the white male population shows a
numerical increase of 732 persons or 4.5 percent between 1950
and 1960. Among the five age groups, the preschool and young
productive groups decreased by 8.2 percent and 7.5 percent,
respectively.

Among the group where growth took place, the retired
citizen showed the highest gains, 41.9 percent. The establish-
ed productive group showed an increase of 15.2 percent which
is the second highest.

Among the non-white male population the gains and losses
are similar to that of white male population. Between 1950
and 1960, the young productive groups showed a decrease of
480 persons or 14.5 percent. This decrease is substantially
higher than the decrease shown for the white male population.

Among the percent increases the largest gains are found
in the school age and retired citizens.

On a comparative basis, note that the school age growth
was higher for the non-white male than the white males. On
the other hand, the white males showed a much higher percent
increase for the retired group than the non-white males.



- 26



TABLE 16. DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE MALE POPULATION
IN WILSON COUNTY - 1950-1960



Number and
Percent Increase





1950
Number P


ercent


Nut


1960
iber P


ercent


1950-


-1960


Ca t egory


Number


Percent


Preschool

(-5)


1,918




11.9


1


, 761




10. 5


- 157


-8. )


School Age
(5-14)


3,270




20.3


3


, 549




22. 1


279


8.5


Young Productive
(15-34)


5, 453




33.9


5


,044




30.0


-409


-7 . 5


Established Product
(35-64)


Ive 4,754




29. 5


5


, 476




32.4


72J


15.2


Ret ired
(65+)


706




4.4


1


,002




6.0


296


41.9




16,101




100.0


16


,832




100.0


732


4.5



Source: These statistics were compiled from the detailed characteristics
included in the Appendix.



TABLE 17. DISTRIBUTION OF NON-WHITE POPULATION
IN WILSON COUNTY - 1950-1960



Category

Preschool
(-5)

School Age
(5-14)

Young Productive
(15-34)

Established Producti
(35-64)

Ret ired
(65 + )





1950




Nui


iber


Pi


;r c en t


1.


, 749




16.4


2


, 518




23 . 5


3


309




3 1.0


2


,679




25.0




438




4. 1





1960




Nui


nber


P


ercent


1


,664




14.8


3


, 300




29.4


2


,829




25.2


2


, 861




25.6




559




5.0



Number and

Percent Increase

1950-1960



10,693 100.0



11,213 100.0



- 8 5 -4.9

782 31.1

—480 -14.5

182 6.8

12 1 27.6

510 4.8



Source: These statistics were compiled from the detailed cha
included in the Appendix.



-27-



Wilson County's Female Population - White and Non-White

As shown in Tables 18 and 19 the female population gains
and losses by individual age groups are similar to that of the
male population. Between 1950 and 1960 the white females in-
creased numerically 1,305 or 8 percent. The percent decrease
is for the preschool and young productive groups. Note that the
preschool decreased 13.3 percent while the young productive
group decreased by only 1.5 percent. On the other hand, sub-
stantial percent increases are found in the retired and establish-
ed productive groups.

Among the non-white females, the population increased
numerically by 654 or 5.8 percent. Note that its most out-
standing decreases are for the young productive group. This
group decreased 15.2 percent between 1950 and 1960. This
decrease is substantially higher than the white female's de-
crease. The groups that showed the most outstanding growth
are the retired and school age groups.



- 28



TABLE 18. DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE FEMALE POPULATION
IN WILSON COUNTY - 1950-1960



Numb e r and
Percent Increa se





Nui


1950
nber P


e re en t


Nui


1960
nber P


ere en t


1950-


■ 1960


Category


Number


Percent


Preschool
(-5)


1


,831




11.2


1


, 588




9.0


-243


- 13.3


School Age
(5-14)


3


, 182




19.4


3


,389




19.2


207


6.5


Young Productive
(15-34)


5


, 485




33. 5


5


, 402




30.6


- 83


-1.5


Established Product!'
(35-64)


re 4


,921




30. 1


5


,886




33 .3


965


19.6


Ret ired

(65 + )




942




5.8


1


,401




7.9


459


48.7




lb


,361




100.0


17


,666




100.0


1 ,305


8.0



Source: These statistics were compiled from the detailed characteristics
included in the Appendix.



TABLE 19. DISTRIBUTION OF NON-WHITE FEMALE POPULATION
IN WILSON COUNTY - 1950-1960



Category

Preschool
(-5)

School Age
(5-14)

Young Productive
(15-34)

Established Productive 2,762
(35-64)

Ret Ired
(65+)



Source: These statistics were compiled from the detailed characteristics
included in the Appendix.



■29-





1950


ere en t


Nui


1960


ere en t


Number and

Percent Increase

1950-1960


Nui


nber


P


nber


P


Ni


imber


Percent


1


, 769




15.6


1


, 660




13.8




-109


— 6.2


2


,617




23. 1


3


,319




27.6




702


26.8


3


, 712




32.7


3


, 147




26.2




-565


-15.2


2


,762




24.3


3


, 195




26. 7




433


15.7




491




4. 3




684




5.7




193


39.3


11


,351




100.0


1 2


,005




100.0




754


5.8



Sex Characteristics of Wilson City and Wilson County

As shown in Table 20, between 1940 and 1960, Wilson City's
percentage of males and females changed very little among all
classes; however, significant changes are evident within the
two racial groups. In 1940, 1950 and 1960, the non-white
females outnumbered the non-white males by 3.6, 2.6 and 2.7
percent respectively. This means that there was higher out-
migration of non-white males.



TABLE 20. PERCENT MALE AND FEMALE OF THE POPULATION OF
WILSON FOR YEARS 1940, 1950 AND 1960

Percent of Total Population





Whit


e




Non-


White


To


tal


Year


Male




Fema 1 e




Male


Fema 1 e


Male


Fema 1 e


1940


24.8




26.8




22.4


26.0


47.2


52.8


1950


27.8




30.0




19.8


22.4


47.5


52.5


1960


28.9




31.8




18.3


21.0


47.2


52.8


Source:


U. S .


Bureau of


the


Census









Among the white population the distribution shows that the
females outnumber the males; however, the ratio is increasing
rather than decreasing as opposed to the non-white sex ratio.

For the years 1940, 1950 and 1960, the white females out-
numbered the white males by 2.0, 2.2 and 2.7 percent. Among
both racial groups the white females made up the largest pro-
portion for all three decade periods.

As shown in Table 21, the county sex ratio among all classes
has changed very little between 1950 and 1960. Within the two
racial groups the females outnumbered the males, but the pro-
portionate increase has remained similar for the two decade
periods .



30



TABLE 21. PERCENT MALE AND FEMALE OF THE POPULATION OF WILSON
COUNTY FOR THE YEARS 1940, 1950 and 1960



White



Year


Male


Fema 1 e


19 40


29. 1


29.0


1950


29.6


30.0


1960


29.2


30.6



Non-White
Ma 1 e Fema 1 e
20.4 21.5
19.6 20.8
19.4 20.8



Ma 1 e Fema 1 e

49.5 50.5
49.2 50.8

48.6 5 1.4



Source:



Sureau of the Census,


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