Woman's Board of Missions.

Life and light for woman (Volume v.47:10) online

. (page 1 of 7)
Online LibraryWoman's Board of MissionsLife and light for woman (Volume v.47:10) → online text (page 1 of 7)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


If OL. XLVII



OCTOBER, 1917



NO. 10



Life and Light
forWoman




Entered at the Post Office at Boston, Mass., as Second-class Matter



CO NTENTS



Foreword -i-')

Looking Backward Over Fifty Years. By

Frances J. Dyer 42(3

Greetings from One of the Earliest Pupils at '

Inanda 4-54

Some Reminiscences of the First Annual Meeting.

By Mrs. S. Brainard Prall 4.57

Extracts from Letter of Dr. X. G. Clark . . . 4.59



Mary E. Andrews. Bv Mrs. Cliauncev Good-
rich '. 450

The Golden Anniversary Gift. By Clara P.

Bodman 468

Ursula Clarke Marsh. By Margaret Haskell . 474

Olive Parmelee Andrus. By Rev. R. S. M.

Emrich 479

Jubilee Meditation. By Caroline E. Bush . . 483

Receipts 486



Roman's loarb of Utaatntta

503 Congregational House, Boston, Mass.



President

Mrs. CHARLES H. DANIELS, Wellcsley, Mass.

First Vice President

Mrs. FRANK GAYLORD COOK, Cambridge, Mas.s.

Vice Presidents
Mrs. A. A. LINCOLN, Wollaston, Mass. :Mrs. E. E. STRONG, Auburndalc, Mass.

Mrs. N. G. CLARK, Boston Mrs. JAMES L. BARTON, Newton Centre, Mass.

Miss SUSAN HAYES WARD, South Berwick, Me.

Foreign Secretary

Miss KATE G. LAMSON, Boston



Recording Secretary

Mrs. J. FREDERICK HILL, Cambridge, Mass.

Home Secretary
Miss HELEN B. CALDER, Boston
Secretary of Young People's Work

Miss MARY PRESTON, Boston



Editorial Secretary

Miss ALICE M. KYLE, Boston
Associate Secretary

Miss ANNE L. BUCKLEY, Boston



Treasurer




Assistant Treasurer


Miss SARAH LOUISE DAY,


Boston Miss
Auditor
SAMUEL F. WILKINS, Boston
Directors


S. EMMA KEITH, Boston


Miss Carrie Borden


Miss Frances V. Emerson


Mrs. Waldo Conant


Miss E. Harriet Stanwood


Miss Clara E. Wells


Mrs. John F. Thompson


Mrs. Henrv D. Noyes


Mrs. Frederick M. Turner


Mrs. Elbert A. Harvey


Mrs. F. E. Clark


Mrs. Brewer Eddy


Mrs. S. K. Hamilton


Mrs. S. B. Capron


Mrs. W. L. Adam


Mrs. Edward Lincoln Smith


Mrs. Joseph Cook


Mrs. David 0. Mears


Mrs. Chfton H. Mix


Mrs. S. B. Capon


Mrs. Walter Fitch


Mrs. Hubert C. Herring


Mrs. Charles F. Weedon


Miss Elizabeth Merriam


Mrs. George L. Richards


Mrs. Edward C. Moore


Mrs. Charles .\. Proctor


Mrs. James R. Jewett


Mrs. Everett E. Kent


Miss Clara P. Bodman


Mrs. Lucius H. Thayer


Miss S. Emma Keith


. Mrs. L. R. Smith


Mrs. H. H. Powers


Miss Lucy W. Burr


Miss Lucy N. Lathrop


Miss Harriet E. Richards


Miss Lilian G. Bates


Mrs. Charles H. Burnhani


Miss Elizabeth B. Herring


Mrs. E. H. Bigelow


Mrs. John W. Little


:Mrs. J. 11. I.arraboe


Mrs. Emily L. McLaughim


Miss Edith Woolsev


Mrs. Albert W. Hitchcock


Mrs. Frank H. Wiggin







iFnrm of iBcqufBt

In maldng devises and legacie.^, the entii'O corporate name of the Board should
be used as follows: —

/ give and bequeath to th?. Wojnan's Board of Missions, incorporated under the

laws of Massachusetts in the year 1869, the sum of



VOL. XLVII



OCTOBER, 1917



NO. 10



Life and Light
for Woman




Entered at the Post Office at Boston, Mass., as Second-class Matter



CONTENTS



Foreword . 42.j Mary E. Andrews. By Mrs. Cltnunccv Good-
rich ! . 460

Looking Backward Over I'ifty \ears. By „,, ^ , , . . „., ^

r- T T\ lor The Golden Anniversary Gift. Bv Clara P.

Frances J.Dyer 42f) r„h„„„



Greetings from One of the Earliest Pupils at
Inanda 4.j4

Some Reminiscences of the First Annual Meeting.
By Mrs. S. Brainard Pratt 4-i7

Extracts from Letter of Dr. X. G. Clark . . . 459



Bodtnan 468

Ursula Clarke Marsh. By Margaret Flaskcl! . 474

Olive Parmelee Andrus. By Rev. R. S. M.

Emrich 479

Jubilee Meditation. By Caroline E. Bush 483

Receipts 486



llnman'0 IBoarJi nf IHtaBtotta

503 Congregational House, Boston, jMass.



President

Mrs. CHARLES H. DANIELS, Wellesley, Mass.



Mr.<:



First Vice President

FRANK GAYLORD COOK, Cambridge, Ma.s.?.



Vice Presidents
Mrs. a. a. LLVCOLN, WoUaston, Mass. Mrs. E. E. STRONG, Auburndalc. Ma.ss.

]Mrs. N. G, CLARK, Boston Mrs. JAMES L. BARTON, Newton Centre, Mass.

Miss SUSAN HAYES WARD, South Berwick, Me.



Recording Secretarj'

Mrs. J. FREDERICK HILL, Cambridge, Mass.

Home Secretary
Miss HELEN B. C ALDER, Boston
Secretary of Young People's Work
Miss MARY PRESTON, Boston
Treasurer
Miss SARAH LOUISE DAY, Boston

Auditor
SAMUEL F. WILKINS, Boston



Foreign Secretary

Miss KATE G. LAMSON, Boston

Editorial Secretary
Miss ALICE :\I. KYLE, Bo.ston

Associate Secretary
Miss ANNE L. BUCKLEY, Boston

Assistant Treasurer
Miss S. EMMA KEITH, Boston





Directors




Miss Carrie Borden


Miss Frances V. Emerson


Mrs. Waldo Conant


Miss E. Harriet Stanwood


Miss Clara E. Wells


Mrs. John F. Thompson


Mrs. Henry D. Noyes


Mrs. Frederick M. Turner


Mrs. Elbert A. Hanxy


Mrs. F. E. Clark


Mrs. Brewer Eddy


Mrs. S. K. Hanulton


Mrs. S. B. Capron


]\Irs. W. L. Adam


Mrs. Edward Lincoln Smith


Mrs. Joseph Cook


Mrs. David O. Mears


Mrs. CKfton H. Mix


Mrs. S. B. Capen


Mrs. Walter Fitch


Mrs. Hubert C. Herring


Mrs. Charles F. Weoden


JNIiss EUzabeth Merriam


^Irs. George L. Richards


Mrs. Edward C. Moore


Mrs. Charles A. Proctor


Mrs. James R. Jewett


Mrs. Everett E. Kent


Miss Clara P. Bodman


Mrs. Lucius H. Thayer


Miss S. Emma Keith


Mrs. L. R. Smith


Mrs. H. H. Powers


Miss Lucy AV. Burr


Miss Lucy N. Lathrop


Miss Harriet E. Richards


Miss Lilian G. Bates


Mrs. Charles H. Burnham


Miss Elizabeth B. Herring


Mrs. E. H. Bigelow


Mrs. John W, Little


Mrs. J. H. Larrabee


Mrs. Emily L. McLaughliTi


Miss Edith Woolsev


Mrs. .\!hcrt W. Hitchcock


Mrs. Frank H. Wiggin







In making devises and legacies, the entire corporate name of the Board should
be used as follows : —

I give and bequeath to ths Woman's Board of Missions, incorporated undrr Ihr

laws of Massachusetts in the ijear 1869, the sum of



Digitized by tine Internet Archive

in 2009 with funding from

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/lifelightforwoma4710woma





Mrs. Miron 'Winslow

Ceylon 1S57-1865

Established Uduvil Seminary

in 1824



Mrs. Mary C. AVinsor

Sirur, India, 1870-1915

Teacher and Trainer of Bible

Women




Mrs. Mary K. Edwards
Inanda, Africa

First Missionary of the Woman's
Board of Missions





Mrs. Ursula Clarke Marsh

Turkey and Bulgaria

Educator and Evangelist



Mrs. Olive Parmelee Andrus
Mardin, Turkey, 1868-1916



(3ln ^tm te0 ^tfe; anit ti^t



Vol, XLVII. October, 191 7 No. 10



Foreword

XN presenting this Jubilee Number of Life and Light to
our readers the Editorial Committee is sure that all will
appreciate the fact that the historical sketch, Looking
Backward Over Fifty Years, has been written by Miss Frances J. Dyer,
who was one of the earliest workers in the Rooms of the Woman's
Board of Missions and who has first-hand knowledge of those first
years. Within the limits of such an article obviously much of value
must be omitted, but in these pages will be found a lifelike presenta-
tion of the women who laid broad and deep the foundations of the
Woman's Board in 1868.

So far as known Mrs. N. G. Clark, Mrs. John Cummings and Mrs.
David Scudder are the only charter members now remaining. Mrs.
S. Brainard Pratt who contributes Some Reminiscences of the First
Annual Meeting was early associated with the Executive Committee
where she served so efiiciently as Recording Secretary.

It has not been possible to procure pictures of all whose faces we
would have been glad to see on these pages, nor to mention all of the
earher missionaries. In the November number there will be addi-
tional historical material.

An extra edition of this issue has been pubhshed and may be ob-
tained on application to Miss Helen S. Conley, 503 Congregational
House. Price five cents.

It should be noted that in 1894 the annual meeting was changed
from January to November, thus bringing the celebration of the
Jubilee in November, 1917, rather than in January, 1918, when the
fifty years would have been actually rounded out, but as two annual
meetings were held in 1895 this is really the Fiftieth Anniversary of
the Board.



426 Life and Light [October

Looking Backward Over Fifty Years

THE WOMAN'S BOARD OF MISSIONS AT HOME AND ABROAD
By Frances J. Dyer

A Memorable Interview

^^^:^HE dramatic story of the haystack prayer meeting at Wil-
■ ^ J hamstown, Mass., in 1806, which led to the formation of
^^^^/ the American Board, had its counterpart, more than half a
century later, in the origin of the Woman's Board of Missions. One
day a woman walking through Pemberton Square, Boston, on her
way to an appointment made by Dr. N . G. Clark asked another
woman, a stranger to her, the way to the Missionary House. The two
entered into conversation and each discovered that the other was
burdened with a sense that something ought to be done for women
and children in heathen lands. The one accosted then said, "My
house is near by; won't you come in and let us pray about it?"
Fancy such a proposition under similar circumstances nowadays!
They were the two women whom Dr. Clark was seeking to bring
together.

The stranger guest was Mrs. Albert Bowker, who became the first
president of the Woman's Board, and the hostess was Mrs. Homer
Bartlett, its first treasurer. What influences have radiated from
those two groups of kneeling figures — the five young men who took
refuge from a thunder storm beneath the historic haystack, and the
two married women who communed in the quiet of an upper room in
a luxurious city home !

The background of the latter scene stretches still farther into the
distant past, for one of Mrs. Bowker's remote ancestors had been
in the habit of rising at midnight, throwing a shawl about her shoul-
ders and wrestling in prayer that some of her descendants might be
instrumental in sending the gospel to heathen lands. The petitions
were seemingly unheeded. Generations came and went and there
was no sign of an answer. But one night a New England mother, in
giving birth to a httle daughter, was told that the child's life must
be sacrificed in order to save her own. She refused to give her con-



19I7J



Looking Backward Over Fifty Years



427



sent. Meantime an aunt in an adjoining room was praying that
both precious lives might be spared, and they were. The child was
Sarah Lamson, afterward Mrs. Bowker. At last the vision of the
remote ancestor was beginning to be a reality. "If it tarry, wait for
it, because it will surely come; it will not tarry."

The Preliminary Meeting



Subsequently Mrs. Bowker sought a further interview with Dr.
N. G. Clark, Foreign Secretary of the American Board, to whom she
unfolded her plan for a missionary board composed exclusively of
women. From a pigeon-hole in his desk he took a pile of letters from
missionaries already in the field, each making an importunate plea
that unmarried "females" be sent out to work among women and
children. This remarkable breaking down of age-long barriers in the
Orient, coupled with the fact that several well-educated women at
home were ready to go to the foreign field if their support could be
assured, was another indication that the time was ripe for action.
After months of further conference forty
devoted w^omen gathered in the Freeman
Place Chapel of the Old South Church,
Boston, on January 2, 1868, and formed
the New England Woman's Foreign Mis-
sionary Society, which later became incor-
porated under the name of the Woman's
Board of Missions. The ofiicers elected
were : —

President, Mrs. Albert Bowker. Vice
Presidents, Mrs. R. Anderson, Mrs. N. G.
Clark, Mrs. S. B. Treat and Mrs. Charles
Stoddard. Corresponding Secretaries, Mrs.
Miron Winslow and Mrs. David C.
Scudder. Recording Secretary, Mrs. J. A.
Copp. Treasurer, Mrs. Homer Bartlett.
Only two of these, Mrs. Clark and Mrs. Scudder, are still living.

The following October the field at home was divided and the
Woman's Board of Missions of the Interior was formed in Chicago.




Mrs. Albert Bowker

Founder of the Woman's Board

of Missions, 1868



428 Life and Light [October

In 1873 the Woman's Board for the Pacific was organized. "He
hath sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat."

Prejudices of the Period

It required marvelous faith for that little group, untrained in public
affairs, to undertake the stupendous task of sending the gospel to
millions of their sisters in non-Christian lands. The measure of their
faith can be better understood by considering the prejudices of the
period. Anything that savored of "woman's rights," which George
Meredith called "the most indigestible fact of the century," was
obnoxious to nearly everybody. Ministers looked coldly and dis-
trustfully upon the movement. Their suspicions are shown by the
pastor who made it a point to be present at the women's meetings
because "no one knew what they would pray for if left alone." A
notable exception was found in the venerable Dr. R. S. Storrs of
Braintree, who sent $75 to constitute three "female members" of his
household life members of the new Board. He wrote: "Though few
days remain to me on earth, may your days be many and your angelic
ministries to the forlorn daughters of idolatry and superstition carry
joy up to the courts of God." The leaders themselves were not
wholly free from traditions. One of them writes, giving her im-
pressions of those early days: "With my good old-fashioned training
that it was wrong for women to speak in meeting, I was a bit scandal-
ized and felt that it took grit as well as grace in those dear women who
filled the pulpit. How little I realized then what an arrant sinner I
should myself become in that line!"

Unconscious Preparation

It seemed a most unpropitious time for women to seek the emanci-
pation of their sisters across the sea, but the stars in their courses were
fighting against the forces of opposition. Just before the Civil War
a great tidal wave of prayer swept into the hearts of American women
and led to a revival of the old Maternal Associations. Through
them confidence was gained in conducting public meetings. A union
society was formed and over 1,000 mothers attended the first annual
meeting in Park Street Church, Boston. Colleges for women were
just coming into existence.



1 9 1 7 ] Looking Backward Over Fifty Years 429

Then came the war, which did more than any other single agency to
develop feminine powers of administration and initiative. It marked
an era in the so-called woman movement. Having learned to feder-
ate their forces in service for their country, the logical result was
unity for other ends. Praying bands of women in Ohio began a
crusade against the liquor evil which ended in the organization of
the Women's Christian Temperance Union. The first women's
clubs, the Sorosis of New York, and the New England Woman's
Club of Boston, started almost simultaneously with the Woman's
Board, the latter having only a few weeks' priority. No doubt the
new enterprise felt the stimulus of this general awakening, and it
was singularly fortunate in the quality of its leadership.

Mrs. Bowker and her Associates

Sarah Lamson, the little girl whose life seemed to be miraculously
saved at birth, grew up in a home of affluence in East Boston and
was sent at the age of fourteen to the Ipswich Female Seminary.
There she came under the influence of two notable teachers, Zilpah P.
Grant and Mary Lyon. They saw that the new pupil had good intel-
lectual capacity, a resolute will, strong imagination, and a peculiar
power to dominate other minds. They agonized in prayer for her
soul with the fervor born of the theology of the times, and her con-
version was a marked experience.

By a strange blunder, her father received word that his daughter
was dead and he drove to Ipswich, taking with him the casket for
her burial. It was a dramatic scene when she met him at the door in
full health and strength. The thought that the rumor might have
been true intensified the religious impressions already received. She
felt that she was a spared monument of mercy for some great work,
and a remarkable deliverance from accidental death later in life
deepened this feeling. On her return home she plunged with the
zeal of a young Crusader into the activities of Maverick Church, of
which she was one of the ten original members. She visited homes of
the poor and prayed at the bedside of the dying. She taught a Bible
class which grew to nearly 100 members. Marriage to Albert Bowker
and the birth of two daughters only quickened her enthusiasm for
humanity, and the Civil War set her soul on fire with patriotism. No



430 Life and Light [October

general on a field of battle marshaled his forces with greater energy
than she displayed in organizing measures of reUef for the soldiers.
For many years she was president of the Union Maternal Associa-
tion. Such were some of the training schools in which her mind was
broadened to grasp the needs of women in lands outside the pale of
gospel privileges, and which fitted her for the presidency of the
Woman's Board of Missions. During the more than twenty years
of her service as president she never missed a meeting.

Mrs. Bowker, as an incident narrated by Mrs. N. G. Clark reveals,
traced the beginning of her knowledge of missionary work to her
interest in a schoolmate, Mrs. Ballantine, who went as a missionary
to India. Feeling that she would certainly not live in such a hostile
land and wishing to be informed of her death, should it occur, Mrs._
Bowker subscribed for The Missionary Herald, and through this
medium the missionary cause became to her a vital concern. Great
is the power of the printed page!

She and her associates formulated an ideal plan of organization.
It embodied the principle of federation, then an unheard-of thing in
women's societies. Auxiliaries were to be formed in every church
and twenty of these would constitute a Branch, co-operating with
the parent Board. The aim was "to arouse in every Congregational
woman and child a living interest in foreign missions." The Phila-
delphia Branch was the first to rally its forces with twenty-five aux-
iharies; New Haven followed with thirty-nine. To-day there are
twenty-four of these Branches and one Conference Association hav-
ing a membership of 47,113, the latest addition this Jubilee year
being the Southeastern Branch, formed in Tampa, Fla., last April.

Each of the four vice presidents, Mrs. Anderson, Mrs. Treat, Mrs.
Clark and Mrs. Stoddard, was the wife of an American Board sec-
retary, and therefore able to contribute a rich fund of information
concerning conditions in foreign lands. The two corresponding
secretaries, Mrs. Winslow and Mrs. Scudder, had served in India
as wives of missionaries, and the former was skilled in the use of
pencil and brush for making large missionary maps, which were
a wonderful help in public assemblies. The recording secretary,
Mrs. J. A. Copp, a person of unusual ability and charm, was the wife
of the pastor of a large and influential church in Chelsea. The



I9I7]



Looking Backward Over Fifty Years



431



treasurer, Mrs. Bartlett, was the wife of a wealthy manufacturer
and a woman of great heart and of far vision. With them were
associated twelve managers prominent in social and religious circles,
including such well-known names as Mrs. Daniel SafTord and Mrs.
Henry F. Durant. The Board was immediately enlarged by adding
seven more vice presidents, all except Mrs. Richard Borden of Fall
River living outside Massachusetts; also another corresponding
secretary, Mrs. George Gould, and a home secretary. Miss Abbie B.
Child, a name soon to be known and loved all over the world. It is
noticeable that she was the only unmarried person in that first official
family of thirty members.

They and their constituents were probably the most influential
and wealthy group of Christian women who, up to that time, ever
united their forces in a common cause. Such union to-day is too
commonplace to awaken comment, but then it made a veritable
sensation. Their service was wholly voluntary, and no salary higher
than SI, 000 has ever been paid by the Board. An incredible
amount of writing was
done by those volunteers.
Long letters from workers
on the field were tran-
scribed by hand, in beau-
tiful script, and sent broad-
cast to the auxiliaries.
The same laborious proc-
ess was applied to appeals
and miscellaneous infor-
mation. A glass stylus
on carbon paper was the
only form of duplication,
and this slow method in-
sured but a single copy.
Their ofl&ce was a little
room in the Missionary

House in Pemberton Square, kindly furnished free of rent by the
American Board.

Of course a magazine was indispensable and the initial number of




First Headquarters ofWoman's Board of Missions
Pemberton Square, 1868-187.3



432 Life and Light [October

a modest quarterly called Life and Light for Heathen Women appeared
in March, 1869, followed the next year by a juvenile publication,
Echoes from Life and Light. At first these magazines were mailed
from Mrs. Bowker's home and for years the wrappers were addressed
by hand by voluntary helpers. Both became monthlies in 1873 and
the word "Heathen" was eliminated from the title of the former.
In 1882 The Mission Dayspring took the place of Echoes. There was
no such plethora of reading matter as women have to-day and the
pages of Life and Light were eagerly read. In course of time the cir-
culation reached over 19,000.

The first year's receipts barely exceeded $5,000 and the sacrificial
gifts were many. One old lady of ninety-seven sent a pair of stock-
ings which she knit herseh, being too poor to contribute money; the
stockings were sold repeatedly until $10 was realized. A pine cone
basket made with much labor by a poor invalid girl as her offering,
shortly before her death, was kept in the rooms and the card attached
telUng her story made its silent appeal for funds.

The financial policy instituted by the Woman's Board in its first
year, that of gathering the money for its pledged work one year to
be expended upon the foreign field the following year, has been
continued. Thus no year of its life has been clouded by a debt.

* The Pioneer Missionaries

The new organization at once pledged the support of seven mission-
aries and eleven Bible readers. The first to be adopted was Mrs.
Mary K. Edwards, an Ohio girl, who, after the death of her husband,
offered her services to the American Board. She sailed from Boston
in August, 1868, and started a school for Zulu girls at Inanda, South
Africa. At the age of eighty-eight she is still living and working at
Inanda Seminary and has not been in America for forty years. Her
versatiHty is evidenced by the fact that when nearly eighty Mrs.
Edwards took a correspondence course in nursing in order to pass
on the instruction to Zulu girls and women.

Miss Mary E. Andrews, also from Ohio, sailed from New York in
March, 1868, for Tungchow, China, then a three mxOnths' journey.
She has been at her post ever since, and is now teaching young men
in the theological seminary in Peking.

* See articles in current number of Life and Light.



igiy]



Looking Backward Over Fifty Years



433



Miss Olive L. Parmelee, a graduate from Mt. Holyoke in 1861, and
afterward a teacher there for five happy years, left in August, 1868, to
take charge of a boarding school for girls in Mardin, Turkey. Later
she became the wife of Rev. A. N. Andrus and died August 25, 1916.

Miss Ursula E. Clarke, an-
other Mt. Holyoke girl, heard
the call from Turkey, sailed in
October, 1868, for Brousa, and
opened a boarding school. In
1874 she married Rev. George
D. Marsh and went with him
to Eski Zagra. The city was
sacked and burned and they
barely escaped with their two
little children. Her varied ac-
tivities continued until Septem-
ber, 1915, when she left Bul-
garia to make her home with
sisters in Claremont, Cal.

Miss Adelia M. Payson ar-
rived at her station in Foochow,
China, in January, 1869. In
her first letter to the Board she
wrote: "I am trying to master
this barbarous tongue and am
told that after twenty years of
study I shall not be indepen-
dent of teachers." After nine

years' service she severed her connection with the Board and went
to Honolulu to teach the Chinese in connection with the Anglican
Church.

Miss Rebecca D. Tracy, daughter of an American Board mission-
ary in Siam, went to Sivas, Turkey, and two years after her arrival


1 3 4 5 6 7

Online LibraryWoman's Board of MissionsLife and light for woman (Volume v.47:10) → online text (page 1 of 7)