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Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences.

Woman's Institute Library of Cookery Volume 5: Fruit and Fruit Desserts; Canning and Drying; Jelly Making, Preserving and Pickling; Confections; Beverages; the Planning of Meals online

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course, be added to the beverage.

67. In all but the first of the recipes that follow, it will be observed
that milk is used for a part of the liquid. The quantity given makes an
excellent beverage, but more or less may be used if desired. However, if
the quantity of milk is changed, the quantity of water should be changed
accordingly. Condensed or evaporated milk may be utilized very nicely in
the making of these two beverages. Milk of this kind should, of course,
be diluted, a half-pint can requiring 2 to 3 cupfuls of water. If
condensed milk is used, less sugar than the recipe calls for may be
employed. A few drops of vanilla added just before serving always
improves the flavor of cocoa or chocolate.

68. PLAIN COCOA. - The quickest and cheapest method of making cocoa is
explained in the recipe that follows. It may be prepared in a saucepan
and poured into the cups or it may be made in the cups themselves. To
improve the flavor of cocoa made in this way, as well as add to its food
value, cream should be served with it. Salt also is used to improve the
flavor of all cocoa and chocolate beverages.

PLAIN COCOA
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

2-1/2 Tb. cocoa
2-1/2 Tb. sugar
Few grains of salt
4 c. boiling water

Mix the cocoa, sugar, and salt, form into a paste by stirring in a
little of the water, and then add the remainder of the water. Serve
with cream.

69. BREAKFAST COCOA. - Delicious cocoa can be made by following the
directions given in the accompanying recipe. Here milk and water are
used in equal amounts. When milk is used in the preparation of this
beverage, a scum of albumin is likely to form on the top of the cups
unless care is taken. To prevent this, the cocoa, as soon as it is
prepared, should be beaten with a rotary egg beater until a fine froth
forms on top. This process is known as _milling_, and should always be
applied whenever milk is used in the preparation of these beverages.

BREAKFAST COCOA
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

2 c. milk
2 Tb. cocoa
2 Tb. sugar
Few grains of salt
2 c. boiling water

Scald the milk. Mix the cocoa, sugar, and salt, form into a paste by
stirring in a little of the boiling water, and then add the scalded milk
and the remainder of the water. Beat with an egg beater until a froth is
formed and serve at once.

70. RICH COCOA. - There are times when it is desired to serve rich cocoa,
as, for instance, with a lunch that is not high in food value or with
wafers at afternoon social affairs. The accompanying recipe explains how
to make cocoa that will be suitable for such occasions.

RICH COCOA
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

4 c. milk
3 Tb. cocoa
1/4 c. sugar
Few grains of salt
1/2 c. boiling water

Scald the milk. Stir the cocoa, sugar, and salt into a smooth paste with
the boiling water and boil for 2 or 3 minutes. Add the scalded milk,
mill, and serve.

71. CREAMY COCOA. - When there is not very much milk on hand and still a
rich, creamy cocoa is desired, the accompanying recipe should be tried.
As will be noted, flour is used in addition to the usual ingredients.
While this is accountable for the creamy consistency of the cocoa, it
should be remembered that the cocoa must be cooked long enough to remove
the raw, starchy flavor of the flour.

CREAMY COCOA
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

4 Tb. cocoa
1 Tb. flour
4 Tb. sugar
Few grains of salt
2 c. boiling water
2 c. milk

Mix the cocoa, flour, sugar, and salt, and stir into a paste with some
of the water. Add the rest of the water, cook for 5 minutes, and then
add the milk, which has been scalded. Mill and serve.

72. HOT CHOCOLATE. - Very good hot chocolate can be made by following
the directions here given. As will be noted, this recipe is similar to
several of those given for cocoa, except that chocolate is substituted
for the cocoa. It may therefore be used on any occasion when cocoa would
be served. It is especially delicious when served with a tablespoonful
or two of whipped cream.

HOT CHOCOLATE

2 c. milk
1-1/2 sq. unsweetened chocolate
1/4 c. sugar
Few grains of salt
2 c. boiling water

Scald the milk. Melt the chocolate over the fire, add the sugar and
salt, and gradually stir in the boiling water. Place over the fire, let
boil for 2 or 3 minutes, and add the scalded milk. Mill and serve plain
or with whipped cream.

73. ICED COCOA OR CHOCOLATE. - An excellent warm-weather beverage
consists of cold cocoa or cold chocolate served either with or without
sweetened whipped cream. Prepare the cocoa or chocolate according to any
of the recipes already given and then allow it to cool. Fill glasses
with cracked ice, pour the cocoa or chocolate over it, and serve either
with or without sweetened whipped cream.

74. LEFT-OVER COCOA AND CHOCOLATE. - As the materials used in the
preparation of cocoa and chocolate are rather expensive, not the
slightest quantity of these beverages that remains after serving should
be wasted. However, a small amount of chocolate usually has to be added
so that it will have a stronger flavor. It may then be thickened with
corn starch for chocolate blanc mange or with gelatine for chocolate
jelly. Either of these served with whipped cream or a sauce of some kind
makes an excellent dessert. Chocolate bread pudding may also be flavored
with these left-over beverages.

It is also a good plan to utilize left-over cocoa or chocolate for
flavoring purposes. However, additional cocoa or chocolate and sugar
should first be added to it, and the mixture should then be boiled to a
sirup. When so prepared it may be used whenever a chocolate flavoring is
desired, such as for flavoring other beverages, cake icings, custards,
sauces for desserts, and ice creams.


SERVING COCOA AND CHOCOLATE

75. When cocoa or chocolate is used to accompany meals, it is served in
the usual sized teacup. However, when either of these beverages is
served at receptions or instead of tea in the afternoon, regular
chocolate cups, which hold only about half as much as teacups, are used.
An attractive chocolate service to use for special occasions is shown in
Fig. 11. The cocoa or chocolate is prepared in the kitchen, but is
served to the guests from a chocolate pot, such as the one shown, in
tall cups that match the chocolate pot in design. If such a service is
not available, the cocoa or chocolate may be poured into the cups in the
kitchen and then brought to the guests on a tray.

[Illustration: FIG. 11]

Besides sugar, which is generally added in the preparation of cocoa and
chocolate, cream usually accompanies these beverages, especially when
they are made without milk or with only a little. If the cream is
whipped and slightly sweetened, a spoonful or two will be sufficient to
render the beverage delightful. In case no cream is on hand,
marshmallows make a very good substitute. One of these should be placed
in the bottom of each cup and the hot beverage poured over it. The
marshmallow softens and rises to the top. When marshmallows are to be
added to cocoa, less sugar should be used in its preparation.

* * * * *

NON-STIMULATING BEVERAGES

CEREAL BEVERAGES

76. NON-STIMULATING BEVERAGES are those which contain neither stimulant
nor alcohol. They are the ones usually depended on to carry nutrition
into the body and to provide the necessary refreshment. In this class of
beverages come the various cereal beverages, fruit drinks, soft drinks,
and milk-and-egg drinks. With the exception of the cereal beverages,
these drinks are of a very refreshing nature, for they are served as
cold as possible and they contain materials that make them very pleasing
to the taste. Most of them can be prepared in the home at much less cost
than they can be purchased commercially prepared or at soda fountains;
so it is well for the housewife to be familiar with their nature and
their preparation.

77. CEREAL BEVERAGES, as the name implies, are made from cereals. Of
these, the _cereal coffees_ are perhaps the most common. They contain
nothing that is harmful, and are slightly beneficial in that they assist
in giving the body some of the necessary liquid. However, they have
absolutely no food value and are therefore of no importance in the diet
except to take the place of stimulating beverages that are likely to
injure those who drink them. They are made of cereals to which sugar or
molasses is added, and the whole is then baked until the cereals brown
and the sugar caramelizes, the combination producing a flavor much like
that of coffee. Plain roasted wheat or bran can be used very well as a
substitute in the making of these beverages. In the parts of the country
where rye is extensively grown, it is roasted in the oven until it is an
even brown in color. It is then used almost exclusively by some persons
to make _rye coffee_, a beverage that closely resembles coffee
in flavor.

78. The _instantaneous cereal beverages_ are made by drawing all the
flavor possible out of the material by means of water. The water is then
evaporated and the hard substance that remains is ground until it is
almost a powder. When water is added again, this substance becomes
soluble instantly. _Instantaneous_ coffee is prepared in the same way.
The way in which to use these beverages depends, of course, on the kind
selected, but no difficulty will be experienced in their preparation,
for explicit directions are always found in or on all packages
containing them.

* * * * *

FRUIT BEVERAGES

INGREDIENTS FOR FRUIT BEVERAGES

79. FRUIT BEVERAGES are those which contain fruit and fruit juices for
their foundation. As there are many kinds of fruit that can be used for
this purpose, almost endless variety can be obtained in the making of
these beverages. One of the important features is that a great deal of
nourishment can be incorporated into them by the materials used. In
addition, the acids of fruits are slightly antiseptic and are
stimulating to the digestion as well as beneficial to the blood.

80. Lemon juice, when mixed with other fruit juices, seems to intensify
the flavor. Because of this fact, practically all the recipes for fruit
beverages include this juice as one of the ingredients. The combination
of pineapple and lemon yields a greater quantity of flavor for
beverages, ices, etc. than any other two fruit flavors. Juice may be
extracted from all fruits easily. To obtain lemon juice for a fruit
beverage, first soften the fruit by pressing it between the hand and a
hard surface, such as a table top, or merely soften it with the hands.
Then cut it in two, crosswise, and drill the juice out, as shown in Fig.
12, by placing each half over a drill made of glass or aluminum and
turning it around and around until all the juice is extracted. To remove
the seeds and pulp, strain the juice through a wire strainer. The juice
from oranges and grapefruit, if they are not too large, may be extracted
in the same way.

81. It is not always necessary to extract juices from fresh fruit for
fruit beverages; in fact, juice from canned fruit or juice especially
canned for beverage making is the kind most frequently employed. For
instance, in the canning of fruit there is often a large quantity of
juice left over that most persons use for jelly. It is a good plan to
can this juice just as it is and then use it with lemon juice or other
fruit juices for these beverages. Also, juices that remain after all the
fruit has been used from a can may be utilized in the same way, no
matter what the kind or the quantity. In fact, unless otherwise stated
in the recipes that follow, the fruit juices given, with the exception
of orange and lemon juice, are those taken from canned fruit or juices
canned especially for beverage making. These juices also lend themselves
admirably to various other uses, for, as has already been learned, they
are used in ices, gelatine desserts, salad dressing, pudding sauces,
etc. Therefore, no fruit juice should ever be wasted.

[Illustration: FIG. 12]

82. The clear-fruit beverages become more attractive when they are
garnished in some way. A slice of lemon, orange, or pineapple, or a
fresh strawberry put into each glass improves the flavor and makes the
beverage more appetizing. Red, yellow, and green cherries may be bought
in bottles and used for such purposes. As these are usually preserved in
wine and are artificially colored, many persons object to their use. A
good substitute for them is candied cherries. These can be bought from
any confectioner and do very well when a red decoration is desired.


PREPARATION OF FRUIT BEVERAGES

83. LEMONADE. - Next to water, no other drink is so refreshing nor
quenches the thirst to so great an extent as lemonade. Lemonade is
suitable for many occasions, and as lemons can be purchased at any time
of the year it can be made at almost any season. The lemon sirup
prepared for this beverage may be used as desired, for if it is put in a
cool place it will keep for a long time. The more the sirup is boiled
down, the better will it keep. A tablespoonful or two of glucose or corn
sirup added to such mixtures when they are boiled will help to keep them
from crystallizing when they stand.

LEMONADE
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

1 c. sugar
1 qt. water
1/2 c. lemon juice

Make a sirup by boiling the sugar and water for a few minutes, and set
aside to cool. Add the lemon juice and then dilute with ice water to
suit the taste. Serve in glasses and garnish each one with a slice of
lemon or a red cherry.

84. ORANGEADE. - While not so acid in flavor as lemonade, orangeade is
also a delightful drink. On warm days, drinks of this kind should take
the place of the hot ones that are generally used during the
cold weather.

ORANGEADE
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

3/4 c. sugar
1 qt. water
1/2 c. orange juice
3 Tb. lemon juice

Make a sirup of the sugar and 1 cupful of the water. Allow this to
become cool and then add the fruit juices and the remaining water. Pour
into glasses and garnish each glass with a slice of orange, a red
cherry, or a fresh strawberry.

85. GRAPE LEMONADE. - An excellent combination in the way of a beverage
is lemonade and grape juice. Besides adding flavor to the lemonade, the
grape juice gives it a delightful color.

GRAPE LEMONADE
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

1 qt. lemonade
1 c. grape juice

Prepare the lemonade in the manner explained in Art. 83. Add the grape
juice to the lemonade and stir well. Serve ice cold in glasses.

86. PINEAPPLE LEMONADE. - Another variation of lemonade is produced when
pineapple juice is added to it. To garnish this beverage, a slice of
lemon and a spoonful of grated pineapple are generally used. This
pineapple beverage is delightful with wafers or small cakes as
refreshments for informal social affairs during hot weather.

PINEAPPLE LEMONADE
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

1 c. water
3/4 c. sugar
3 c. ice water
1 c. juice from canned pineapple
3 lemons

Make a sirup of the water and sugar, and set aside to cool. Add the ice
water, the pineapple juice, and the juice of the lemons. Stir well,
strain, and serve. Garnish with a slice of lemon and a spoonful of
grated pineapple added to each glass.

87. MINT JULEP. - Mint drinks are not served so often as some of the
other fruit beverages, but those with whom they find favor will
undoubtedly be delighted with mint julep prepared according to the
following recipe:

MINT JULEP
(Sufficient to Serve Eight)

4 sprigs mint
1 c. sugar
1 qt. water
1 c. red cherry juice
1/2 c. pineapple juice
1/2 c. orange juice
1/4 c. lemon juice

Crush the mint with the sugar, using a potato masher or a large spoon.
Add the water and fruit juices and strain. Serve over crushed ice and
garnish the glasses with sprigs of mint. Tall, narrow glasses are
especially attractive for serving this drink.

88. FRUIT NECTAR. - The term nectar was used by the early Greeks to mean
the drink of the gods. Now it is often applied to an especially
delightful beverage. Pineapple combined with lemon is always good, but
when orange juice is also used, an excellent nectar is the result.

FRUIT NECTAR
(Sufficient to Serve Eight)

3/4 c. sugar
2 c. water
1-1/2 c. orange juice
1 c. pineapple juice
1/2 c. lemon juice

Boil the sugar and water for 2 minutes and then cool. Add the fruit
juices, strain, and serve over cracked ice.

89. RED-RASPBERRY NECTAR. - A beverage that is pleasing to the eye, as
well as delightful to the taste, can be made by combining red-raspberry
juice and lemon juice with the required amount of sugar and water. The
juice from canned raspberries may be used for this drink.

RED-RASPBERRY NECTAR
(Sufficient to Serve Six)

1/2 c. sugar
2 c. water
1/2 c. lemon juice
1-1/2 c. red raspberry juice

Boil the sugar and water for 2 minutes and allow the sirup to become
cool. Then add the fruit juices, strain, and serve over cracked ice.

90. SPICE CUP. - Occasionally a spice drink seems to be just what is
desired. When this is the case, the directions given in the accompanying
recipe for spice cup should be followed.

SPICE CUP
(Sufficient to Serve Eight)

1-1/2 c. sugar
1-1/2 pt water
12 cloves
2-in. stick cinnamon
3 lemons
4 oranges
2 drops oil of wintergreen

Boil the sugar, water, and spices together for 5 minutes and allow the
sirup to become cool. Add the juice of the lemons and oranges and the
wintergreen oil and serve in glasses over cracked ice. Garnish each
glass with slices of orange and lemon or a piece of preserved ginger.

91. FRUIT PUNCH. - As fruit beverages are very often served at small
receptions, club meetings, or parties, a recipe that will make a
sufficiently large quantity is often desired. The amounts mentioned in
the following recipe will make enough fruit punch to serve thirty to
forty persons if punch glasses are used, or sixteen to twenty if
ordinary drinking glasses are used.

FRUIT PUNCH

2-1/2 c. sugar
1 qt. water
2 c. fruit juice (raspberry, strawberry, or cherry)
6 oranges
6 lemons
1 pt. can grated pineapple
1 c. strong black tea (strained)
1 qt. carbonated water

Boil the sugar and water for 2 minutes and allow the sirup to become
cool. Then add the fruit juice, the juice of the oranges and lemons, the
pineapple, and the tea. Just before serving, add the carbonated water,
which lends a sparkling appearance and a snappy taste to a beverage of
this kind. Pour over cracked ice into sherbet or punch glasses or into
tall narrow ones.

92. GINGER-ALE PUNCH. - As most persons like the flavor of ginger ale,
punch containing ginger ale is always a favorite when a large company of
persons is to be served. The quantity that the accompanying recipe makes
will serve twenty to twenty-five persons if punch glasses are used, or
ten to twelve persons if drinking glasses are used.

GINGER-ALE PUNCH

1-1/2 c. sugar
1 pt. water
2 lemons
3 oranges
1 pt. grape juice
4 sprigs fresh mint (crushed)
1 lemon sliced thin
1 qt. ginger ale

Boil the sugar and water for 2 minutes and allow the sirup to become
cool. Drill the juice from the lemons and oranges and add this with the
grape juice, crushed mint, and sliced lemon to the sirup. Just before
using, add the ginger ale and serve over cracked ice.


SOFT DRINKS

93. A class of very popular non-stimulating beverages are the SOFT
DRINKS sold at the soda fountains. Many of them can also be bought in
bottles and so may be purchased and served at home. These drinks really
consist of carbonated water and a flavoring material that is either
prepared chemically and colored or made of fruit extracts. Sometimes ice
cream is added, and the drink is then called _ice-cream soda_.

94. Soft drinks include phosphates, ginger ale, coca cola, birch beer,
root beer, and various other drinks called mashes, sours, and freezes.
While these are pleasing to the taste and have the advantage of being
ready to drink when prepared, it is advisable not to indulge in them too
frequently, because excessive use of them is liable to affect the
system. Besides, beverages that are just as satisfactory as these so far
as flavor is concerned and that are made of much better material can be
prepared at home at far less cost. With these drinks, as with other
commercially prepared articles of food, the cost of preparation and
service in addition to the cost of materials must be paid for by
the consumer.


NOURISHING BEVERAGES

95. Many times it is necessary or desirable to administer food in the
form of liquid. When this is to be done, as much nourishment as possible
should generally be incorporated into the beverage. To meet such a need,
the following recipes are presented. In each case, the quantities
mentioned make a drink sufficient for only one person, so that if more
than one are to be served the amounts should be multiplied by the number
desired. The food materials used in these drinks are easily digested,
and the beverages are comparatively high in food value.

96. At most soda fountains, these nourishing drinks are offered for
sale, so that if one does not desire the work of preparation, they may
be obtained at such places. However, as practically all the ingredients
are materials used in the home and are therefore nearly always on hand
in most households, drinks of this kind may be prepared at home at much
less cost than when purchased already made. The main thing to remember
in their preparation is that the ingredients should be as cold as
possible and that the beverage should be cold when served.

97. The beverages containing eggs may be made in more than one way. They
may be mixed in a bowl or an enamelware dish with a rounded bottom and
then beaten with a rotary egg beater, or they may be mixed in a metal
shaker designed especially for this purpose and then shaken thoroughly
in that. In drinks of this kind, the point to remember is that the eggs
should be beaten or shaken until they are light and foamy.

98. CHOCOLATE SIRUP. - While chocolate sirup is not a beverage in itself,
it is used to such an extent in beverages, as well as an accompaniment
to numerous desserts, that it is well for the housewife to know how to
prepare it. It may be kept an indefinite length of time if it is put
into a glass jar and sealed. Here, as in the preparation of other
sirups, a tablespoonful or two of corn sirup or glucose will help to
keep the sirup from crystallizing.

CHOCOLATE SIRUP

4 sq. chocolate
1 c. water
3/4 c. sugar

Melt the chocolate in a saucepan, stir in the water, and add the sugar.
Boil until a thick sirup is formed.

99. PLAIN MILK SHAKE. - A pleasant variation for milk is the plain milk
shake here given. Even those who are not fond of milk and find it hard
to take like it when it is prepared in this way.

PLAIN MILK SHAKE

1 c. milk
2 tsp. sugar
Few drops of vanilla
Dash of nutmeg

Beat all the ingredients together with an egg beater or shake well in a
shaker and serve in a glass with cracked ice.

100. EGG MILK SHAKE. - The simplest form of egg drink is the egg milk
shake explained in the accompanying recipe. This is an extremely
nutritious drink and is often served to invalids and persons who must
have liquid nourishment.

EGG MILK SHAKE

3/4 c. milk
1 egg
1 Tb. sugar
Pinch of salt
Few drops of vanilla

Mix all the ingredients and beat the mixture with a rotary beater or
shake it in a shaker. Serve in a glass over cracked ice.

101. EGG CHOCOLATE. - The addition of chocolate to an egg milk shake
improves it very much and makes a drink called egg chocolate.

EGG CHOCOLATE

3/4 c. milk
1 egg
2 Tb. chocolate sirup
Few drops of vanilla
Pinch of salt

Mix all the materials and beat with an egg beater or shake thoroughly in
a shaker. Serve in a glass with cracked ice.

102. CHOCOLATE MALTED MILK. - A preparation that is much used in
nourishing drinks and that furnishes a great deal of nutrition is malted
milk. This is made from cow's milk and is blended by a scientific
process with malted grains. It comes in powder form and may be purchased
in bottles of various sizes. It is well to keep a good brand of malted
milk on hand, as there are various uses to which it can be put.

CHOCOLATE MALTED MILK

3/4 c. milk
1 egg
2 Tb. malted milk
2 Tb. chocolate sirup
Few drops of vanilla
Pinch of salt

Mix and shake in a shaker or beat with a rotary egg beater. Serve in a
glass with cracked ice.

103. ORANGE EGG NOG. - The accompanying recipe for egg nog requires
orange for its flavoring, but any fruit juice may be substituted for the


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Online LibraryWoman's Institute of Domestic Arts and SciencesWoman's Institute Library of Cookery Volume 5: Fruit and Fruit Desserts; Canning and Drying; Jelly Making, Preserving and Pickling; Confections; Beverages; the Planning of Meals → online text (page 21 of 27)