Yei Theodora Ozaki.

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TtlE JAPANESE
FAIRY B00K.





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S.'P'Dutton Co jCondon: OonsCaBCe & Co




THE JAPANESE
FAIRY BOOK

Rendered into English by

YEI THEODORA OZAKI

New Edition with a Frontispiece by

TAKE SATO



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CONSTABLE AND COMPANY LIMITED

LONDON BOMVA]C;V SYDNEY

E. P. DUTTON AND COMPANY NEW YORK



First Published . . 1903.

Second Impression . 1904.

Third Impression . 1906.

Fourth Impression . 1908.

Second Edition . . 1922.



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Printed in Great Britain by'3he.'Whi',cjr irs'fre&, Ltd., London and Tonbridge






TO

ELEANOR MARION-CRAWFORD.
|f pirate tljis ooh

TO YOU AND TO THE SWEET CHILD-FRIENDSHIP THAT YOU GAVE ME
IN THE DAYS SPENT WITH YOU BY THE SOUTHERN SEA, WHEN YOU
USED TO LISTEN WITH UNFEIGNED PLEASURE TO THESE FAIRY
STORIES FROM FAR JAPAN. MAY THEY NOW REMIND YOU OF MY
CHANGELESS LOVE AND REMEMBRANCE.



Y. T. O.



TOKIO.



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THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
NATHAN STS ^H 343 EAST 32nd STR**T



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PREFACE.



THIS collection of Japanese fairy tales is the outcome of
a suggestion made to me indirectly through a friend by
Mr. Andrew Lang. They have been translated from the
modern version written by Sadanami Sanjin. These stories
are not literal translations, and though the Japanese story and
all quaint Japanese expressions have been faithfully preserved,
they have been told more with the view to interest young
readers of the West than the technical student of folk-lore.

Grateful acknowledgment is due to Mr. Y. Yasuoka, Miss
Fusa Okamoto, my brother Nobumori Ozaki, Dr. Yoshihiro
Takaki, and Miss Kameko Yamao, who have helped me with'
translations.

The story which I have named "The Story of the Man
who did not Wish to Die " is taken from a little book written a
hundred years ago by one Shinsui Tamenaga. It is named
Chosei Furo, or " Longevity." " The Bamboo-cutter and the
Moon-child'.' is taken from the classic " Taketari Monogatari,"
and is not classed by the Japanese among their fairy tales,
though it really belongs to this class of literature.

The pictures were drawn by Mr. Kakuzo Fujiyama, a
Tokio artist.

In telling these stories in English I have followed my fancy



vi Preface.

in adding such touches of local colour or description as they
seemed to need or as pleased me, and in one or two instances
I have gathered in an incident from another version. At all
times, among my friends, both young and old, English or
American, I have always found eager listeners to the beautiful
legends and fairy tales of Japan, and in telling them I have
also found that they were still unknown to the vast majority,
and this has encouraged me to write them for the children of
the West.

Y. T. 0.

TOKIO.



CONTENTS.



PAGE

MY LORD BAG OF RICE ... ... ... ... ... ... ... I

THE TONGUE-CUT SPARROW ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 12

THE STORY OF URASHIMA TARO, THE FISHER LAD ... ... ... ... 26

THE FARMER AND THE BADGER ... ... ... ... ... ... 43

THE SHINANSHA, OR THE SOUTH POINTING CARRIAGE ... 54

THE ADVENTURES OF KINTARO, THE GOLDEN BOY ... ... 60

THE STORY OF PRINCESS HASE 74

THE STORY OF THE MAN WHO DID NOT WISH TO DIE ... ... ... 87

THE BAMBOO-CUTTER AND THE MOON-CHILD ... ... ... ... 98

THE MIRROR OF MATSUYAMA IIQ

THE GOBLIN OF ADACHIGAHARA ... ... ... ... ... ... 140

THE SAGACIOUS MONKEY AND THE BOAR ... ... ... ... ... 148

THE HAPPY HUNTER AND THE SKILFUL FISHER ... ... ... ... 153

THE STORY OF THE OLD MAN WHO MADE WITHERED TREES TO FLOWER 177

THE JELLY FISH AND THE MONKEY ... ... ... ... ... ... 189

THE QUARREL OF THE MONKEY AND THE CRAB ... ... ... ... 203

THE WHITE -HARE AND THE CROCODILES 214

THE STORY OF PRINCE YAMATO TAKE ... ... ... ... ... 224

MOMOTARO, OR THE STORY OF THE SON OF A PEACH ... ... ... 244

THE OGRE OF RASHOMON ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2&2

HOW AN OLD MAN LOST HIS WEN ... ... ... ... 273

THE STONES OF FIVE COLOURS AND THE EMPRESS JOKWA... 283



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE

PUTTING ASIDE ALL FEAR, HE WENT FORWARD DAUNTLESSLY ... ... 3

HIDESATO TOOK ANOTHER ARROW ... ... ... ... ... ... 6

THE PROCESSION ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... IO

AND WITH THESE DREADFUL WORDS SHE DROVE THE BIRD AWAY ... ... 14

THE LADY SPARROW INTRODUCED ALL HER FAMILY ... ... ... ... l8

THE OLD WOMAN HAD NEVER BEEN SO FRIGHTENED IN HER LIFE ... ... 24

THE GATE OF SOME LARGE PALACE ... ... ... ... ... ... 32

A BEAUTIFUL LITTLE PURPLE CLOUD ROSE OUT OF THE BOX ... ... 40

THE FARMER'S WIFE POUNDING BARLEY ... ... ... ... ... 44

HE SET THE BUNDLE OF GRASS ON FIRE ... ... ... ... ... 49

HE RAISED HIS OAR AND STRUCK AT THE BADGER WITH ALL HIS STRENGTH 52

HE THOUGHT AND PONDERED DEEPLY ... ... ... ... ... ... 55

HE MOUNTED THE DRAGON ... ... ... 58

THEN THE MONKEY AND THE HARE HOPPED OUT ... ... ... ... 62

THE KIND GENERAL GRADUALLY UNFOLDED HIS PLAN ... ... ... 69

LORD RAIKO ORDERED KINTARO TO THE RESCUE ... ... ... ... 72

HASE-HIME LISTENED IN AN ATTITUDE OF RESPECT ... ... ... ... 76

HER FATHER SENT FOR HER AND TOLD HER WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF HER 8l
TAKEN BY SURPRISE, SHE COULD HARDLY REALISE THAT IT WAS HER

FATHER 84

THE CRANE FLEW AWAY, RIGHT OUT TO SEA 9!

HE SCREAMED OUT TO JOFUKU TO COME AND RESCUE HIM 95

HE TOOK THE LITTLE CREATURE IN HIS HAND 99



x List of Illustrations.

PAGE

THE SCREENS SLID OPEN, REVEALING THE PRINCESS ... ... ... I 17

THE WIFE GAZED INTO THE SHINING DISC ... ... ... ... ... I2O

THEY WATCHED HIM AS HE WENT DOWN THE ROAD ... ... ... ... 122

"WHAT i HAVE BROUGHT YOU is CALLED A MIRROR " ... ... ... 124

THE MOTHER ROUSED HERSELF, AND TOOK HER DAUGHTER'S HAND... ... 128

IN THE ROUND MIRROR BEFORE HER SHE SAW HER MOTHER'S FACE ... 130
HE PRESSED THE OLD WOMAN TO LET HIM STAY, BUT SHE SEEMED VERY

RELUCTANT ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 14!

WHAT HE SAW FROZE THE BLOOD IN HIS VEINS ... ... ... ... 145

AFTER HIM RUSHED THE DREADFUL OLD HAG... ... ... ... ... 146

THE MONKEY BEGAN HIS TALE OF WOE ... ... ... ... ... 149

THE MONKEY WAS RUNNING AFTER THE THIEF AS FAST AS HIS LEGS WOULD

CARRY HIM... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 151

THE HAPPY HUNTER IN VAIN BESOUGHT HIS BROTHER TO PARDON HIM ... 155

THE CUTTLEFISH OPENED THE TAI'S MOUTH l68

HE TOOK OUT THE JEWEL OF THE FLOOD TIDE ... ... IJ4

THE DEEPER HE DUG, THE MORE GOLD COINS DID THE OLD MAN FIND ... 178.

THE WITHERED TREE AT ONCE BURST INTO FULL BLOOM ... ... ... 183

THE DAIMIO ORDERED HIS RETAINERS TO PUT THE IMPOSTOR IN PRISON ... 1 86

THE DRAGON KING BLAMED THE DOCTOR FOR NOT CURING THE QUEEN ... IQI

" PLEASE DON'T GO SO FAST, OR I AM SURE I SHALL FALL OFF," SAID THE

MONKEY ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 196

THEY BEAT THE JELLY FISH TO A FLAT PULP 2OI

THE MONKEY BEGAN TO PLUCK AND EAT AS FAST AS HE COULD 2O6

" IT WAS YOUR FATHER'S FAULT, NOT MINE," GASPED THE UNREPENTANT

MONKEY ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 212

SOME OF THE CROCODILES RAN AFTER THE HARE AND CAUGHT HIM ... 217

THIS MAN HAD A KIND HEART, AND LOOKED AT THE HARE VERY PITYINGLY 2ig
WHEN THE PRINCESS HAD LOOKED AT THE KIND BROTHER'S FACE, SHE

WENT STRAIGHT UP TO HIM ... ... ... ... ... ... 222



List of Illustrations. xi

PAGE

A DAGGER FLASHED BEFORE HIS EYES ... ... ... ... ... 230

A MONSTER SERPENT APPEARED ... ... ... ... ... ... 24!

SHE SET TO WORK TO WASH THE CLOTHES ... ... ... ... ... 245

THE PEACH SPLIT IN TWO OF ITSELF ... ... ... ... ... ... 247

MOMOTARO RETURNED TRIUMPHANTLY HOME, TAKING WITH HIM THE DEVIL

CHIEF AS HIS CAPTIVE ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 260

WATAN'ABE FINES THE ARM OF THE OGRE ... ... ... ... ... 264

SOMEONE WAS KNOCKING AT THE PORCH, ASKING FOR ADMITTANCE ... 268

IN THIS WAY THE OGRE ESCAPED WITH HIS ARM ... ... ... ... 270

THE DEMON TOOK THE GREAT LUMP FROM THE OLD MAN*S CHEEK... ... 277

THE OLD MAN TOLD HIS NEIGHBOUR ALL THAT HAD HAPPENED ... ... 279

THERE WAS NOW A GREAT WEN ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF HIS FACE AS ON

r i f K i - 1 ' i' i * * . 2 o i

THE EMPRESS JOKWA ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 284

HAKO LOOKED BACK, AND SAW EIKO UNSHEATHING A LARGE SWORD ... 285

EIKO VISITS THE FIRE KING ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2QO

THE AMBASSADORS SET OUT IN THE MAGIC CHARIOTS ... 294



PROPERTY OF THE
CITY OF faw YORK

JAPANESE FAIRY BOOK.



MY LORD BAG OF RICE.

LONG, long ago there lived in Japan a brave warrior known
to all as Tawara Toda, or " My Lord Bag of Rice." His true
name was Fujiwara Hidesato, and there is a very interesting
story of how he came to change his name.

One day he sallied forth in search of adventures, for he had
the nature of a warrior and could not bear to be idle. So he
buckled on his two swords, took his huge bow, much taller
than himself, in his hand, and slinging his quiver on his back
started out. He had not gone far when he came to the bridge
of Seta-no-Karashi spanning one end of the beautiful Lake
Biwa. No sooner had he set foot on the bridge than he saw
lying right across his path a huge serpent-dragon. Its body
was so big that it looked like the trunk of a large pine tree and
it took up the whole width of the bridge. One of its huge claws
rested on the parapet of one side of the bridge, while its tail lay
right against the other. The monster seemed to be asleep, and
as it breathed, fire and smoke came out of its nostrils.

At first Hidesato could not help feeling alarmed at the sight
of this horrible reptile lying in his path, for he must either
F.B. E



2 Japanese Fairy Book.

turn back or walk right over its body. He was a brave man,
however, and putting aside all fear went forward dauntlessly.
Crunch, crunch! he stepped now on the dragon's body, now
between its coils, and without even one glance backward he
went on his way.

He had only gone a few steps when he heard someone
calling him from behind. On turning back he was much sur-
prised to see that the monster dragon had entirely disappeared
and in its place was a strange-looking man, who was bowing
most ceremoniously to the ground. His red hair streamed over
his shoulders and was surmounted by a crown in the shape of
a dragon's head, and his sea-green dress was patterned with
shells. Hidesato knew at once that this was no ordinary
mortal and he wondered much at the strange occurrence.
Where had the dragon gone in such a short space of time ?
Or had it transformed itself into this man, and what did the
whole thing mean ? While these thoughts passed through his
mind he had come up to the man on the bridge and now
addressed him :

" Was it you that called me just now ? "

"Yes, it was I," answered the man; " I have an earnest
request to make to you. Do you think you can grant it to
me?"

"If it is in my power to do so I will," answered Hidesato,
" but first tell me who you are ? "

" I am the Dragon King of the Lake, and my home is in
these waters just under this bridge.'"'

" And what is it you have to ask of me ? " said Hidesato.

" I want you to kill my mortal enemy the centipede, who



My Lord Bag of Rice. 3

lives on the mountain beyond," and the Dragon King pointed
to a high peak on the opposite shore of the lake.



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Putting aside all Fear, he went forward Dauntlessly.



" I have lived now for many years in this lake and I have a
large family of children and grandchildren. For some time past
we have lived in terror, for a monster centipede has discovered

B 2



4 Japanese Fairy Rook.

our home, and night alter night it comes and carries off one
of my family. I am powerless to save them. If it goes on
much longer like this, not only shall I lose all my children, but
I myself must fall a victim to the monster. I am, therefore,
very unhappy, and in my extremity I determined to ask the
help of a human being. For many days with this intention I
have waited on the bridge in the shape of the horrible serpent-
dragon that you saw, in the hope that some strong brave man
would come along. But all who came this way, as soon as
they saw me were terrified and ran away as fast as they could.
You are the first man I have found able to look at me without
fear, so I knew at once that you were a man of great courage.
I beg you to have pity upon me. Will you not help me and
kill my enemy the centipede ? '

Hidesato felt very sorry for the Dragon King on hearing his
story, and readily promised to do what he could to help him.
The warrior asked where the centipede lived, so that he might
attack the creature at once. The Dragon King replied that
its home was on the mountain Mikami, but that as it came
every night at a certain hour to the palace of the lake, it
would be better to wait till then. So Hidesato was conducted
to the palace of the Dragon King, under the bridge. Strange
to say, as he followed his host downwards the waters parted to
let them pass, and his clothes did not even feel damp as he
passed through the flood. Never had Hidesato seen anything so
beautiful as this palace built of white marble beneath the lake.
He had often heard of the Sea King's Palace at the bottom of
the sea, where all the servants and retainers were salt-water
fishes, but here was a magnificent building in the heart of



My Lord Bag of Rice. 5

Lake Biwa. The dainty goldfishes, red carp, and silvery trout,
waited upon the Dragon King and his guest.

Hidesato was astonished at the feast that was spread for
him. The dishes were crystallised lotus leaves and flowers,
and the chopsticks were of the rarest ebony. As soon as they
sat down, the sliding doors opened and ten lovely goldfish
dancers came out, and behind them followed ten red-carp
musicians with the koto and the samisen. Thus the hours
flew by till midnight, and the beautiful music and dancing had
banished all thoughts of the centipede. The Dragon King was
about to pledge the warrior in a fresh cup of wine when the
palace was suddenly shaken by a tramp, tramp ! as if a
mighty army had begun to march not far away.

Hidesato and his host both rose to their feet and rushed
to the balcony, and the warrior saw on the opposite mountain
two great balls of glowing fire coming nearer and nearer.
The Dragon King stood by the warrior's side trembling
with fear.

" The centipede ! The centipede ! Those two balls of fire are
its eyes. It is coming for its prey ! Now is the time to kill it."

Hidesato looked where his host pointed, and, in the dim
light of the starlit evening, behind the two balls of fire he
saw the long body of an enormous centipede winding round
the mountains, and the light in its hundred feet glowed like
so many distant lanterns moving slowly towards the shore.

Hidesato showed not the least sign of fear. He tried to
calm the Dragon King.

" Don't be afraid. I shall surely kill the centipede. Just
bring me my bow and arrows."



Japanese Fairy Book.




Hidesato took another Arrow.



My Lord Bag of Rice. 7

The Dragon King did as he was bid, and the warrior
noticed that he had only three arrows left in his quiver. He
took the bow, and fitting an arrow to the notch, took careful
aim and let fly.

The arrow hit the centipede right in the middle of its head,
but instead of penetrating, it glanced off harmless and fell to
the ground.

Nothing daunted, Hidesato took another arrow, fitted
it to the notch of the bow and let fly. Again the arrow
hit the mark, it struck the centipede right in the middle
of its head, only to glance off and fall to the ground. The
centipede was invulnerable to weapons ! When the Dragon
King saw that even this brave warrior's arrows were power-
less to kill the centipede, he lost heart and began to tremble
with fear.

The warrior saw that he had now only one arrow left in his
quiver, and if this one failed he could not kill the centipede.
He looked across the waters. The huge reptile had wound its
horrid body seven times round the mountain and would soon
come down to the lake. Nearer and nearer gleamed the fire-
balls of eyes, and the light of its hundred feet began to throw
reflections in the still waters of the lake.

Then suddenly the warrior remembered that he had heard
that human saliva was deadly to centipedes. But this was no
ordinary centipede. This was so monstrous that even to think
of such a creature made one creep with horror. Hidesato
determined to tiy his last chance. So taking his last arrow
and first putting the end of it in his mouth, he fitted the notch to
his bow, took careful aim once more and let fly.



8 Japanese Fairy Book.

This time the arrow again hit the centipede right in the
middle of its head, but instead of glancing off harmlessly as
hefore, it struck home to the creature's brain. Then with a
convulsive shudder the serpentine body stopped moving, and
the fiery light of its great eyes and hundred feet darkened to
a dull glare like the sunset of a stormy day, and then went out
in blackness. A great darkness now overspread the heavens,
the thunder rolled and the lightning flashed, and the wind
roared in fury, and it seemed as if the world were coming
to an end. The Dragon King and his children and retainers
all crouched in different parts of the palace, frightened to death,
for the building was shaken to its foundations. At last the
dreadful night was over. Day dawned beautiful and clear.
The centipede was gone from the mountain.

Then Hidesato called to the Dragon King to come out
with him on the balcony, for the centipede was dead and he
had nothing more to fear.

Then all the inhabitants of the palace came out with joy,
and Hidesato pointed to the lake. There lay the body of the
dead centipede floating on the water, which was dyed red with
its blood.

The gratitude of the Dragon King knew no bounds. The
whole family came and bowed down before the warrior, calling
him their preserver and the bravest warrior in all Japan.

Another feast was prepared, more sumptuous than the first.
All kinds of fish, prepared in every imaginable way, raw, stewed,
boiled and roasted, served on coral trays and crystal dishes,
were put before him, and the wine was the best that Hidesato
had ever tasted in his life. To add to the beauty of everything



My Lord Bag of Rice. 9

the sun shone brightly, the lake glittered like a liquid diamond,
and the palace was a thousand times more beautiful by day
than by night.

His host tried to persuade the warrior to stay a few days,
but Hidesato insisted on going home, saying that he had
now finished what he had come to do, and must return. The
Dragon King and his family were all very sorry to have him
leave so soon, but since he would go they begged him to accept
a few small presents (so they said) in token of their gratitude
to him for delivering them for ever from their horrible enemy
the centipede.

As the warrior stood in the porch taking leave, a train ot
fish was suddenly transformed into a retinue of men, all wearing
ceremonial robes and dragon's crowns on their heads to show
that they were servants of the great Dragon King. The
presents that they carried were as follows :

First, a large bronze bell.

Second, a bag of rice.

Third, a roll of silk.

Fourth, a cooking pot.

Fifth, a bell.

Hidesato did not want to accept all these presents, but as
the Dragon King insisted, he could not well refuse.

The Dragon King himself accompanied the warrior as far
as the bridge, and then took leave of him with many bows and
good wishes, leaving the procession of servants to accompany
Hidesato to his house with the presents.

The warrior's household and servants had been very much
concerned when they found that he did not return the night



IO



Japanese Fairy Book.



before, but they finally concluded that he had been kept by the
violent storm and had taken shelter somewhere. When the




The Procession.



servants on the watch for his return caught sight of him they
called to everyone that he was approaching, and the whole
household turned out to meet him, wondering much what the



My Lord Bag of Rice. 1 1

retinue of men, bearing presents and banners, that followed
him, could mean.

As soon as the Dragon King's retainers had put down
the presents they vanished, and Hidesato told all that had
happened to him.

The presents which he had received from the grateful
Dragon King were found to be of magic power. The bell
only was ordinary, and as Hidesato had no use for it he
presented it to the temple near by, where it was hung
up, to boom out the hour of day over the surrounding
neighbourhood.

The single bag of rice, however much was taken from it
day after day for the meals of the knight and his whole family,
never grew less the supply in the bag was inexhaustible.

The roll of silk, too, never grew shorter, though time after
time long pieces were cut off to make the warrior a new suit oi
clothes to go to Court in at the New Year.

The cooking pot was wonderful, too. No matter what was
put into it, it cooked deliciously whatever was wanted without
any firing truly a very economical saucepan.

The fame of Hidesato's fortune spread far and wide, and
as there was no need for him to spend money on rice or silk or
firing, he became very rich and prosperous, and was henceforth
known as My Lord Bag of Rice.



THE TONGUE-CUT SPARROW.

LONG, long ago in Japan there lived an old man and his wife.
The old man was a good, kind-hearted, hard-working old
fellow, but his wife was a regular cross-patch, who spoilt the
happiness of her home by her scolding tongue. She was
always grumbling about something from morning to night.
The old man had for a long time ceased to take any notice
of her crossness. He was out most of the day at work in the
fields, and as he had no child, for his amusement when he
came home, he kept a tame sparrow. He loved the little bird
just as much as if she had been his child.

When he came back at night after his hard day's work in
the open air it was his only pleasure to pet the sparrow, to
talk to her and to teach her little tricks, which she learned
very quickly. The old man would open her cage and let her
fly about the room, and they would play together. Then
when supper-time came, he always saved some tit-bits from
his meal with which to feed his little bird.

Now one day the old man went out to chop wood in the
forest, and the old woman stopped at home to wash clothes.
The day before, she had made some starch, and now when she
came to look for it, it was all gone ; the bowl which she had
filled full yesterday was quite empty.

While she was wondering who could have used or stolen



The Tongue-cut Sparrow. 13

the starch, down flew the pet sparrow, and bowing her little
feathered head a trick which she had been taught by her
master the pretty bird chirped and said :

" It is I who have taken the starch. I thought it was
some food put out for me in that basin, and I ate it all. If I
have made a mistake I beg you to forgive me ! tweet, tweet,
tweet! "

You see from this that the sparrow was a truthful bird,
and the old woman ought to have been willing to forgive
her at once when she asked her pardon so nicely. But
not so

The old woman had never loved the sparrow, and had often
quarrelled with her husband for keeping what she called a
dirty bird about the house, saying that it only made extra
work for her. Now she was only too delighted to have some
cause of complaint against the pet. She scolded and even
cursed the poor little bird for her bad behaviour, and not
content with using these harsh, unfeeling words, in a fit of
rage she seized the sparrow who all this time had spread out
her wings and bowed her head before the old woman, to show
how sorry she was and fetched the scissors and cut off the
poor little bird's tongue.

" I suppose you took my starch with that tongue ! Now
you may see what it is like to go without it ! ' And with
these dreadful words she drove the bird away, not caring in
the least what might happen to it and without the smallest
pity for its suffering, so unkind was she !

The old woman, after she had driven the sparrow away,
made some more rice-paste, grumbling all the time at the



'4



Japanese Fairy Book.



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And with these Dreadful Words she drove the Bird away,



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The Tongue-cut Sparrow. 15

trouble, and after starching all her clothes, spread the things
on boards to dry in the sun, instead of ironing them as they
do in England.

In the evening the old man came home. As usual, on the
way back he looked forward to the time when he should reach
his gate and see his pet come flying and chirping to meet him,


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