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Town Topics (Princeton), Sep. 2-8, 1951 (Volume v.6, no.26) online

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Town Topics



WE NOMINATE



Walter Phelps Hall, one of the great teachers of
his time and an enthusiastic Princetonian for nearly
four decades, who on the threshold of still another
academic cycle personifies the spirit and abilities
that make American education all that it is. At a
time of year when the community is thinking in
terms of kindergartens, schools, colleges and even
institutes for advanced study. Hall, Dodge Profes-
sor of History at the University, becomes to many a
spokesman for education at its various levels in
that down through the years he has never permit-
ted either his students or himself to forget the
importance of the individual human being.

In the restless fall of 1951, in the face of growing
stress on specialization, Hall at age 67 will continue,
as he has been doing since he accepted his first post
at Amherst College in 1909, to interpret history in
his unpredictable way. His lectures in the Modern
European field, frequently punctuated with walk-
ing-stick flourishes and garnished with window-
rattling desk pounding, will often include material
from a variety of unrelated sources. For instance,
a layman's reasoned estimate of Napoleon might
well command as much attention as the conclusions
of a searching" scholar.

Known to thousands of University alumni as
"Buzzer" — in recognition of the hearing-aid he was
forced to "adopt" shortly after his graduation from

PRINCETON'S M



Yale with Phi Beta Kappa honors in 1906— Hall last
spring created some sort of a Princeton record. In
the annual senior poll he was singled out for special
honors; the equivalent of the "vote of gratitude"
bestowed upon him exactly a quarter-century ear-
lier by the Class of 1926. Many men admit that their
serious interest in university work began in his
courses and one former student doesn't hesitate'to
write: "Long after graduates have forgotten most
of their studies they can recall vividly how Buzzer
made history live for them."

Hall, a native of Newburgh, N. Y., was called to
Princeton in 1913, the year following the publica-
tion of his first book, and has held forth continuous-
ly as a member of the Department of History — with
time out for World War I duty with the American
Field Service, the Army Y.M.C.A. and the Amer-
ican Red Cross. His "Iron Out of Calvary," written
during the war in which his older son gave his life
in Italy while serving as an infantry patrol leader,
will be remembered as one of the most convincing
interpretative histories of World War II.

For teaching by what might be termed the "pro-
cess of infection;" for stripping away the superficial
and permitting others to see things for themselves;
for certainly proving that "good teachers are more
important than anything they teach;" he is our
nominee for

AN OF THE WEEK



DR. E. N. MANUKAS
DR. LEON C. NUROCK

OPTOMETRISTS

Eyes Examined



THIS MAY SOLVE YOUR PROBLEM!

enience a V j-ton all-enclosed



We have for your convenienc.
van available for U-Drlve.lt U
$1.25 per hour plus 10 cents a
mum. For full details on ret



t1U



-entals of all kinds, call
NASSAU U DRIVE IT

255 NASSAU STREET TELEPHONE 2388



September 2-8, 1951



THE KNITTING SHOP

Ml Nassau St. Tet 308



@OK-



Ifa later tho



Special Xmas Card
Sale



STONE



WALD'

13 Palmer Square
Air-Conditioned



Quality Meats & Poultry

FRESH PRODUCE
FROZEN FOODS

GROCERIES



HILL'S MARKET

FINE FOODS FOR FORTY TEARS



Best Procurable

Wines

Spirits

Liquors




WINE & GAME SHOP

6 Nassau St.— Tel. 2468 or 3748
FREE DELIVERY



Desirable
Servisoft
Says:



The household swindler
—hard water— is elimi-
nated by SERViSOFT
Water!

Call Today for Details!

J. W. Millers' Sons

230 Alexander St. ■ Tel. 523

Princeton Fuel Oil Co.

216 Alexander St. Tel. 1100



a inn n anmrii

;lied Every Thursday Throughout

Donald C. Stuart Jr.

Dan D. Coyi.e
Editors and Publishers



Mailed without charge



Princeton Borough and
to part or all of West



Box 371. Princeton, N. J. Telephone 2A2i:
Vol. VI. No 26 September 2-8. 1951



Topics of the Town



Young < music in the elementary
grades).

Township Schools. Almost 700
pupils will be enrolled in the Town-
ship Schools, when they get under
way at 8:30 Wednesday, Septem-
ber 5th. Enrollment at the Valley
Road School will probably jump

Protn last years peak. 589, to 600
while over 90 children will bene-
111 from the new kindergarten inn-
gram which has replaced the all-
day pre-first grade at the Stony
Brook School.

The kindergarten, under the di-
rection of Mrs. Doi I i
Miss Marion Fursyihe, will [ n , l un v
morning and at'l.i n,.un -.■s- l ,,n
Morning scholars will iy ,u«si I\
those who bus to school, wild the
"walkers" turning out in
for the afternoon schedule

Mis. Bertha M Eisonmann, Su-
— Continued on Page 3



RUSCO

Self-Storing

Combination

Stonn Windows

Nassau Appliance Co.



Back to School. The father of a
Princeton first-grader-to-be. anx-
ious to impress upon his daughter
the importance of starting off on
the right foot in school, was wax-
ing oratorical about the glories of
the three "R's". To the beaming
parent's gratification, the child
agreed wholeheartedly but then
added impoi tantly: "Thai's right.
Daddy I want to learn how to read
M, in awaj theii I .-an read the
cqmics."

Whether interested in comics, or
even more significant mattei -■.
n ai ■ .:.ooo young Princetonians
of all ages and dimensions an- m
the process of trooping back to
school this week with the re-open-
ing of the Borough, Township and
St. Faul's Schools. Other schools
in the community will resume op-
erations in mid-month, followed bj
the institutions of higher education
late in Septembei .

In a community in which educa-
tion and research are the primary
industries it was apparent thai the
quiet of the Labor Day Weekend
was much like the lull befi
storm and it was hard to believe
that in four short weeks Colum-
bia's and Princeton's football teams
would be whaling the whey out of
one another in Palmer Stadium.

With the start of stni another
academic year, these were the facts

Borough Schools. Registration for
all new pupils will be completed
Tuesday, September 4th, between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00
p.m. (Not Wednesday, September
5th, as announced last u eeh I
Classes will start at 8:30 Thursday
for an enrollment, which, accord-
ing to Supervising Principal B.
Woodhull Davis, will approach the
1.875-mark, including some 1.060
high school students.

One index of the Princeton Area's
growth is the fact that in the high
school building this year every
room will be used every period of
each school day. In short, building
needs — at the high school level —
will have to be considered in the
near future, for beginning in Sep-
tember. 1953, the school system will
be confronted with a steadily in-
creasing high school enrollment for
a period of several years.

The Borough teaching staff, with
the addition of live new members,
now consists of 89 persons, an all-
time high. Recently named ap-
pointees and their fields of concen-
tration are: Francis A. Sevier
(Mathematics in the High School);
Mrs. Ethel Thomas (English and
History in the High School i : Mis.
Dorothy Pace (rejoining the Ele-
mentary School staff); Miss Mar-
jorie Smith, a Princeton High
School graduate (Nassau Street
School staff); Miss Sarah Anne



MAYFLOWER



2^gTp R ,vATE
^ ROOM
' STORAGE



'YOU have the key !

CALL 1848

MANNING'S

ONWIDE MAYFLO

SERVICE

Safe Storage, Too



The Little Gallery

39 Palmer Square — Tel. 395



Custom-Made
Draperies

Slip Covers

Unusual Fabrics
By the Yard

NASSAU INTERIORS

162 Nassau St. — Tel. 2561



LAHLERE'S RESTAURANT

Reopening Friday. August 31sl



Go "Bad to College" in a Cute Gingham Plaid Shirt

Also in smart broadcloth in white, yellow, pink and blue
Long Sleeve— $3.95, Short Sleeve— $3.50

H. P. CLAYTON

86 Palmer Square Telephone 86

Closed Saturdav at Noon



Perfect Solutions for Your Housing Problems

We Have Available for Immediate Occupancy

These Delightful Apartments:

Four-Room Apartment. Bath. Unfurnished —

$125 A Month

Three and a Half-Room Apartment. Bath, Unfurnished —

$90 A Month

SKILLMAN & SKILLMAN, Realtors



247 NASSAU STREET



TELEPHONE 3822



RUPTURED?

Security With Comfort




DeLuxe Truss



Come in and let us show you
this modern hernia appliance



We also have all sizes of elastic
stockings, a perfect blend of sheer
Nylon and Latex rubber that re-
quires no second pair of hose. Com-
fort, support and an attractive ap-
pearance are guaranteed.



EDWARD A. THORNE — THE DRUGGIST

188 NASSAU STREET TELEPHONE 17



-Town Topics, September 2-8, 1951-



For all your farm andjjarj-n
J. Percy Van Zaridt Co.

Tel. Ilonrvrrll 537

Blawenburf, N. i.



Wallpapering and Painting
Call

H. A. BURGER & SONS

MT N is>.i>i Mm, Tfl «9



For Prompt, Efficient Service

Making Travel Reservations

CALL THE PRINCETON

TRAVEL BUREAU

Tel. ?300, Eat. 65r




Interiors



frVU(Uftl|U

Summer Slip Covers for a
Cool Atmosphere

Princeton Decorating Shop



Choice Meats & Poultry
Frozen Foods

Refrigerated Delivery Service

Dally 9.11 a.m.



Lyons Market

8 Nassau St — Tels. 89, 2483



Be Smart <

For Smart
back to

COLLEGE
WEAR

YOUNG MENS SHOP

' c^ta/l CO
DoNMELLYtJoM

OUTFITTERS- MEN* BOYS

35 EAST STATE ST.

^nr^*V^r^r^^>*«f^r*V*VV l <^s«^^^^^^^ r ^l«V

DON'T FOOL

with a home washer in
this weather. Let us do
tin' washing and ironing
both.

Universe

LAUNDRY^
* CLEANERS



TOPICS OF THE TOrV

Page 2



,i. rl With
tirsl full-



■ I

hool [in-
dustrial

.

,, ,r | ril

graduate
Wtnczel

r«de): Mrs Eva

si i nm iii

i I ■ :

■ i . .mi i . i n . heofu, « ni

I H I B

.. ■ lain, an experience ■

i ■ hei i 1 1 "in a simi-

ttoii with the
(Nj.) Hotptart.

St. Paul's. Opening Wed
, pti rnbi i It* tl I fO a in h mi
, ri , ,,, ,, in,, -ni comparable to last



Other School Notei. The Hun

. 1 1 i i.H mm. ,i;i » Si ptembei

:M ,i [ai :-•■ i tudenl bodj
,,i t ne ;,,, ■ -in boys,

announced the election ol three
la its Board ot Trustees: Dr. John
iv siy. Pi ofesB i Politii mid

i Pi iin-i ton Surveys;

Robert G Lechner, Clhiton, N. J.,
,,!,. -inn. held "i Hun's Department
ol Physical Education; Thomas n

< '. thei s, Cincinnati, Ohio, i t-

■ ,ir. e 'i he I lolumbus

;, ...i launching Its

i j i .ii .in i he i amberi Es-
tate ■■■ hi begin i la e ne ■ I rue ■■

: ij vlth M.-iii;. i



Mail Call. Foi reasons ol econ-
mv and in keeping w Ith the Post-
iii, , i iepai i in. ni ' program



li Ml, llllllMII


ol




,i, :. n


:,,,, kin






,




Mil 1




: ™ .HI,


upon


ocol


mil ■


, inl;




111,




■ i ,i.im "














thai mail


.ii n






,, r. ,,i itlvi re


I ed


schedul ■-


at been


posted in the po 1 iffii











100- i Hi,, 195]

i Drive clobei

loo pei ceni partii

b i i red \ an Dei r, i o-

li ' i Bus ss

Othei membei s ol the

I rati, u-
h i. « s. Humphrey,

in J 'I'll a '

I. ,1. i-soi

■■ ,

i ,l, B. Red-
'n, I Wil-
li ' I M .i Schneev/eiss.



Push- Button War

hi influence' has ■
he Wrlght-Pattc



Dayl



F,,u-







\ ll,M •



electronic "strategist," eliminating
inn, ii ol the guesswork in wi
probable

been det eloped I
General Leighton i Davis rite
Continued on Pag



In Princeton
They Go Together!

PACKARD

and
SILVESTER MOTOR CO.

23» Nassau St. Tel. 955



In the Center of Princeton
At Palmer Square

NASSAU TAVERN HOTEL

For Your Summer Comfort:

Air-Conditioned Cocktail Lounge

and Dining Rooms



Yes



You CAN Do Something
About Summer Weather



We will deliver a desk pr floor fan that will stir up the air ai

dry you off or a window fan or attic fan for real cooling cor

i] the ultimate in summer cooling, -we Will discuss

COflAliuUet to cool, dehumidify and filter the air.

It will pny to consult u* first. We are the only firm in this ar

specialising exclusively in air moving equipment. Our experien

is unmatched and our prices are lower than most. Installatio

i : Ice by our own trained staff. Ask about our tree trial pla

IF IT MOVES AIR IT'S OUR BUSINESS



McLean
Engineering Laboratories



250 Nassau St.




• WHY





It Pays to Pay by Check


Todav, progressive people use checks for these
reasons:


excellent


SAVES TIME — No change-making, and check stubs are
;> permanent record.


MORE BUSINESSLIKE— You make a better i
on people who count.


mpression


RECEIPTS UNNECESSARY— The cancelled

self is a receipt.


check it-


Why don't you enjoy these advantages? Open a checking
iint here — this week!


li®fl^^»¥^^^m


P Ft INC ETON, N.J.





JP£S For School


fys&L




^is^








Suits






Sport Coats






Slacks






Accessories


^^ The Prep Shop


12 Chambers Street Telephone 2450



-Town Topics, Stpttmber 8-8, 1961-



Pro-tek-tiv Shoes
ostonians — Bostoiiian Jrs.

TOTO'S SHOE STORE

n Witherspoon Street



It's New to Us



IT'S STILL SUMMER

and there are
STILL GOOD BUYS

SUMMER SPORTSWEAR



W. H. Lahey

150 Nassau Street
Opp. Firestone Library



Come Look
At Our Bright

NEW FALL
CLOTHES

Elise Goupil

217 Nassau Street phone 3466



Make Wolman's

Your Back-to-School

Headquarters

We have a complete line of
children's needs. Gym Suits
for boys and girls, dresses,
shoes, slacks, underwear,
etc.

Wolman's
Dept. Store

25 Witherspoon St. Tel. 649




Wood Repairs

Station Wagons
and Trucks

New Jersey's largest trim

shop : finest workmanship :

tow prices. Call Trenton

4-3149 or drive in for

quick service.

Top Covers Auto Glass

Seat Covers Upholstery

Truck Seats and Backs

Machinery Covers

Tarpaulins

6x6 Haystack Covers

Strongly reinforced, with grom-
and waterproofed.

Duckbac Canvas
Waterproofing

Duckbac canvas waterproofing
solution made to rigid govern-
ment specifications for salvag-
ing old tarpaulins, machine
covers, etc will not harden or
crack canvas. A boon to fann-
ers, truckers and summer
camps.

5 gal. Cans 1.50 gal.
55 gal. drums 1.25 gal.



AUTO PRODUCTS-^.

1104-12 PrtiMwton A*^



(CLOTHES MATH CONT'D)

i back to where we got
grounded last week — Hulit's

HcaUy -in. seams with

g I tnt.1v leather underpinnings

foi the rough-scuff element in your
Ing lor granted that all the
tribe hi- worn thru at least a cou-
irs i>t saddle shoes, sneak-
ers Kfords— you might let them

work iii-n ravages toi better, their
feminine wiles, for this is really a
little girl's shoe> on a new mocas-
sin - toe shoe cut out like a rather
broguish Mary Jane. This looks
well with skills and sweaters and
comes in either brown or blood as
does a similar shoe, built up exact-
ly like an oxford but with a double
strap where you'd expect the usual
thong tie. Another mocassin-type
oxford with a heavy crepe sole
should snub toe-stubbing in even
the wildest Indian. This comes in
brown, only, and like all the other
Buster Browns mentioned is sized
from 8'.i to 12 at $6.95 ... 12'; to 3
at $7.95.

For bigger boys and girls (sizes
12'i to 3) thcre're loafers and loaf-
ers and loafers. We're glad to see it
— for like saddle shoes, these seem
to look well, whether polished or

For dancing daughters there's a
new angle to the perennial Mary
Janes. This year they've a dorsey
cut that seems to kayo all the
cracking and peeling instincts of
patent leather when it's made on a
straight unbending last. These come
with thin ankle straps, neat danc-
ing-school bows and the nice flat
ballet-look we like on our Alice-in-
Wonderlands.

From dancing to pillow fights is
a long haul, but we don't want to
fail to mention that Hulit's now
carries a complete size-range of
those wonderful pull-on socks that
started with hard-bitten skiers and
have graduated down to the young-
est backslider in the clan. These
start with miniature sizes like 18
months, go right up in various ver-
sions to size 10. Our own cowboy
is simply wild over a pair in black
knit with a Hopalong Cassidy mo-
tif, and since the things can't
scratch the furniture we're glad
to get away so easily. It might have
been hip boots! These start at $1.95
for the smallest sizes.

Bailey's, 14 Witherspoon Street,
is rightly pleased with their Step-
master shoes, built with a porous
inner lining that creates it's own
an-conditioning. This plus a special
metatarsal arch support and neo-
lite soles make $5.95 a small price
to pay for either dress-straps or
oxfords. Regular sizes 4'i to 12.
Also at the same stop we found a
huge stack of gym suits. Now we've
always been under the impression
that a gym suit was something that
just automatically drifted into a
locker, but Mr. Bailey assured me
that was pure delusion . . . that
they had to be bought and paid for.
So for "all young Bernarr MacFad-
den addicts — -Bailey's has the regu-
lation blue sailcloth kind in all sizes
7 to 20. Also in the rough-and-ready
department are the famed Dickie
frontier pants in every size from
2 to 14. and to wear with them
Ship'n Shore blouses which Mr.
Bailey has managed to dredge up
in children's sizes. Now why hasn't
someone thought of that before?

Coats that grow are making con-
versation at the Little Clothes Line.
These come in good-looking dark
plaids or navy blue chinchilla . . .
have belted backs, brass-band but-
tonings plus the happy faculty of
being able to stay on a small frame
for more than one season due to ex-
tra hem and sleeve allowances. The
starting price for these is $36.95 and
the sizes range from 4 to 12.

Much heated conversation here

made of the traditional Byrd cloth
but lined with the same sort of in-
sulating material you blow into
houses. We can't quite decide
whether they blow the stuff into
the snow-suits, too, but have Mrs.
Lord's word that they're warm
without being heavy and anyone
who has tried carrying a child plus
snowsuit knows that's a weighty
problem. The one-piece variety in
sizes 2 to 4 goes for $14.75; $19.95
takes two (pieces) in sizes 4 to 6x.
We haven't had to cope, yet, with
the long versus short-pant contro-
— Continued on Page 9



Back-to-School

Fashions

b>

MAYME MEAD



SLITS — COATS — DRESSES

« Tulane Street t.-i. K

Boaradale

Air Conditioned for 1

IIou



Hr.mwille

Slutpping Comfort



, ( Ios.mI S ; .tur.l.»\N



BAMMAN'S

BAMMAN DISTRIBUTORS INC.
"At the Head of the Town"
LABOR DAY WEEKEND SPECIALS
Sunkist Pineapple Juice No. 2 17c 6/1.00

Today's Pineapple Juice 46 oi. 39c 3/1.15

Musselman's Apple Juice 46 oz. 27c 4/1.05

Sunkist Pineapple Chunks No. 2 29c 4/1.10

Del Monte Crushed Pineapple No. 1 17c 6/1.00

Del Monte Crushed Pineapple No. 2 27c 4/1.05

MacDonald's Orange and

Grapefruit Juice No. 2 17c 6 1.00

Musselman's Red Tart

Pitted Cherries No. 2 29c 4/1.10

Deliveries Wee
Lawrenceville
Project Daily.

TELEPHONE 1280
CLOSED ALL DAY MONDAY (LABOR DAY)



DESTINED FOR SUCCESS




PLAID STORM COAT

Mouton Collar and Alpaca Lined

7 to 14 at $34.95

Also 4 to 6x With Hat

and Slacks at $34.95

Another Example of Your Money's Worth at

Lillian ffet/crun

Specialists in Fine Children's Wear
20 Nassau Street (Air-Conditioned) Tel



-Town Topics, September 2-8, 1951-



Overweight? Tired?

Need Relaxation?
Get FIGURE. AID at

CHRISTINE'S

12 Spring St. — Tel. 378



ANNOUNCING

Photography by
Edward A. Dalton

formerly with B.ichrach, N. Y.,

and Gittings of Texas

specializing in wedding candids

and home portraits with

Clearose Studio



For

Complete

Decorating Service

Bootherstone Interiors

III < I. .ml., r* M l.i

turdnyi 'in Sept.)



Dr. Nathan Kasrel

OPTOMETRIST

Eye Examinations

Office Hours: 9 - 5:30
Open Ev?s. by Appointmei

130 NASSAU STREET
Tel. 3567



Geystone

(he non-yellowing

WHITE

mm*

As durable arid as easy to keep
clean as Ihe finish on your cat!



^ Thu unique enamel hai graced

^. many of Ameika's moil luwri

.^ out homes and historic shrini..

«**l II has Ihe whiteness of jwrxe

• lain, as well as porcelain's per-

£ manence ol color. If you're

^ willing fo pay a little more, you

» can save a substantial sum

mi Ihroughout the years by enatn-

5 eling wilh EOELVICE and always

**"*' being proud of lis appearance!



£ Morris Maple & Son |£




TOPICS OF THE TOWN

— Continued from Page 3

jit for the
the Idea to Prof<
kar Hoi

■ and Dr. John
von Neumann, brilliant mathema-
tician .it Hi - [nstitul
Study.

he was
i heory of




eumann, in




I

will) It






I

i



cannoi ivoid takli

I

bomb i'

Crock of the Week. It

■ ■.. .

I



lUttlOl 5,

'i he i i

: poi ting to be

tui ■■ hi an unidentified

gentleman te



Weekend Conference. A
Bible Conference, sponsored by a
group of Princeton. ans headed by
W. Douglas Smith, will be held here
Labor Day Weekend. Open
to the public, the conference's Sun-
srhiTluled for
10:30, 3:00 and 7:30 at Ro

th the Labor Day sessions

convening in th*- Weal

liege Auditorium at 10:30
I 6:15. The Labor Day pio-
— Continued on Page 9



VACATION
ANNOUNCEMENT

We Will Re-Open

Tuesday, September 4th

Luttman's Luggage

FINE LEATHER GOODS



APARTMENT - STORE * GARAGE
OR OTHER BUSINESS PROPERTY

install

p ro fitable



STQkoS



coal-fired
heating

J. W. Miller's Sons

230 Alexander Street
Telephone 523



dote






eve



RE-OPENING WEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 5th

HELEN 8ALLBR
63 Palmer Square



In the Spotlight I It i p ion-
Ian lined O.

Brow (, theli daughter, Linda,

ind Tennej and I 'ouglas

Carroll plas the leading i oles In
b pjctoi lallzed feature appi

i he Sept mbei I b i naUa

circulated Elne, "Battel

and G m " Pi i Square and

III.' High S. I pi.iM.li. I.:i.k-.li..!.s



"We A.I As Your Office"
Miiil — Phone Servioe

Bur-Wick's Service Calls



Recipe for Delightful Dining

Take your choice of such dishes as Baked Virginia Ham,
an Gratin Potatoes and Green Beans; Individual Chicken
Pie in Casserole; or Poached Eggs Benedict with Grilled
Ham and Broccoli Hollandaise. Eat at your leisure in
comfortable, air-conditioned.



50 NASSAU STREET
Closed Sunday, September '•;, and Labor Day




School Days. School Days. Perfect BUSTER BROWN Days!

See our complete line of BUSTER BROWN SHOES

HULIT'S, Inc.



110 Nassau Street



Open 8.30-5.30 Closed Wednesday Afternoon
Friday Evening Until 9



Telephone 1952



-Town Topics, September 2-8. 1951-



News of the Theatres



SUMMER THEATRES
Herbert Kenwith's fifth Prince-
ton Summer Season reaches the
end of its star-blazed 1951 trail this
Saturday, with Constance Bennett
finishing out the tenth and final
week in Samson Raphaelson's com-
edy, "Skylark."' At St. John Tyr-
rell's LambertviHe Music Circus
"Finian's Rainbow" continues for
another week, ending its crowg-
pleasing run September 9th. On La-
bor Day Kay Francis, once Holly-
wood's clock-stopping femme fatale,
opens with Joel Ashley in a new
comedy. "Mirror, Mirror."
THE PLAYHOUSE
Meet Me After the Show (Thurs.-
Sat.) is a standard hot-weather
musical cut from familiar oloth
color, singing, dancing and, in this
instance, comedy. Betty Grable's
presence in a backstage setting as-
sures some of Hollywood's best song
and dance presentations, although
the story (one of marital compli-
cations) isn't good enough to carry
its own weight.

The Law and the Lady iSun-
Tues.) may well be the very last
of "The Last of Mrs. Cheney." the
25-year-old romantic melodrama
from which this lilm has been
adapted. Greer Garson, now sport-
ing dark tresses, and Michael Wild-
ing are paired (respectively* as a
bright but low-born beauty and a
ne'er-do-well British peer in a ca-
reer of genteel crime dedicated to
bilking the unwary. The pjot un-
folds slowly, with MarjoTie Mains
providing the besj </om<'dv as a
rich and brassy San Francisco
widow.

People Will Talk (Wed.-SaU is
the first picture since "All About
Eve" for producer Dan yl F. Za-
nuck and director Joseph L. Man-
kiewicz. Using some of Princeton
University's buildings (unidentified
as such) as back-drops and employ-
ing a handful of Pi ii
graduates as "walk-ons,
ma is built around the career of a
medical school faculty member
(Cary Grant), who marries a war-


1 3

Online LibraryYork College of PennsylvaniaTown Topics (Princeton), Sep. 2-8, 1951 (Volume v.6, no.26) → online text (page 1 of 3)