York College of Pennsylvania.

York College of Pennsylvania (Volume 1985-1986, Vol. 42) online

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English Composition


6


Social and/or Behavioral Sciences




Electives


6


Mathematics of Business*


3


Word Processing/Records Management


3


Typing


5


Super\'isor}' Management


3


Physical Education


2


Principles of Marketing


3




31


Sophomore Year


Credili


Speech


3


Elementary Accounting I*


3


Office Procedures


3


Business Machines


1


Organizational Behavior


3


Humanities Elective


3


Principles of Computer Information




Systems


3


Personnel Relations


3


Office Administration


3


Business Elective


3


Electives


3




31



Mn this curriculum. Accounting and Mathematics of Business will fulfill the
Mathematics requirements.



-^■^9




79




mmtm^mi^-



Course Descriptions



I


. ... 102


^^K Advanced Historv Courses • • • •


. ... 127


^^P American Historv • • ■ •


. ... 126


^^' Anthropology • • ■ ■

Applied Music Courses ■ • • •


82

. ... 138


Aquatic Activities ■ • • •


....119


Art Appreciation and History ■ ■ • ■


. ... 132


Art Education ■ • • •


134


Behavioral Science Department • • • ■


82


Biological Science Department • ■ ■ •

Business Aciministration Department ■• • •

Business Education ■ ■ ■ •


91


101


. ... 103


! Chemistry • • • •


. ... 146


1 Computer Information Systems ■ • • •


. ... 105


Criminal Justice • • • •


83


Criminalistics (Evidence Technician) • • ■ •


86


Economics • ■ ■ ■


. ... 106


\ Education Department- • • •


....112


« Engineering ■ ■ • •


146


English and Speech Department


. ... 120


I European History ....


125


Foreign Languages ...

Geography ■ . ■ ■

* Gerontology ....


134


125


86


: Government/Public Administration • ■ ■ .


. ... 129


Health Record Administration


95


Historical and Theoretical Courses ...
.. History and Political Science Department • • • •


. ... 139


. ... 124


■ History— The Third World ....

Humanities and Fme Arts Department ...
Individual Sports ....


. ... 128


. ... 132


....118


Intercultural Studies ...


. ... 128


Long-Term Care Administration ....


86


Management. . . .


. ... 107


Marketing and Retailing ...


....110


i Mathematics. . . .
f Medical Technology ...


. ... 147


. ... 149


Military Science ...


. ... 130


Music. . . .


. ... 137


Music Education Courses


. ... 140


Nuclear Medicine Technology. .. .


97


Nursing ....


. ... 142


I Performance Courses ....


....138


Philosophy ....


. ... 140


■ Physical Education ....
,1 Physical Science ....


....117


. ... 149


i Physical Science Department ....

Physics....
' Professional Education


. ... 145


. ... 149


....114


Psychology ....
Radio-Television ....


87


. ... 121


Real Estate


....111


Recreation (Therapeutic/Community)


88


Religion ....


. ... 141


Respiratory Therapy . . .


98


Secretarial . . . .


.... 103


Sociology . . . .


89


Studio Courses . . . .


.... 132


Team Sports . . . .


....117


Visual Arts . . . .


.... 132



\brk College



of Pennsylvania



BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
DEPARTMENT

Behavioral Science combines sociology's study of
group life with psychology's study of individual be-
havior.

A major in Behavioral Science is designed to pro-
vide preparation for entry into vocations where be-
havioral science training is desirable (e.g., govern-
mental institutions, social agencies, and industry).

Major requirements are 24 hours in the Behav-
ioral Sciences including B161, B185, B362, B491, and a
course in Anthropology. Additional requirements are
two semesters of Biology, B260 (Statistics), and M105
(Principles of Computer Information Systems).

An internship is available with local agencies
which allows qualified students to apply theory to
realistic situations.

B260 Basic Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

Course is designed to prepare the student for the
application of elementary statistical tools to labora-
tory/field research projects and journal projects/pub-
lication preparation. Topics include descriptive statis-
tics as tools to summarize and describe groups of
data, inferential statistics including parametric and
non-parametric hypothesis testing as tools for mak-
ing inferences about population from samples. Pre-
requisite: S153 or equivalent.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

B261 (B259) Data Analysis with SPSS
Fall-Spring Semesters

An introduction to the computer as a research tool in
the social sciences. Students will learn fundamental
concepts of the computer and analyze data by inde-
pendently creating and running SPSS programs. Pre-
requisite: B260.

1 class period. 1 credit hour.

B491 Behavioral Science Seminar
Fall-Spring Semesters

Individual inquiry under faculty supervision in areas
pertinent to the student and aimed at integrating the
major area by dealing with current developments and
theories. Prerequisite: Major of Senior standing. Re-
quired of Psychology and Sociology Majors.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

B421, B422 Behavioral Science
Internship Program
Fall-Spring Semesters

A program that provides on-the-job experiences in
the application of the Behavioral Sciences. The stu-
dent spends a minimum of 120 hours per semester



with a selected agency in the performance of mean-
ingful tasks within the agency. In addition, confer-
ences with the supervising professor and bi-weekly
period provide for integration of the student's aca-
demic and agency work. The internship provides an
opportunity to explore job possibilities as well as
making academic work more meaningful through
application of theoretical principles. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.

3 credit hours each semester.

B498, B499 Independent Study

The Independent Study Program affords an opportu-
nity for the student who wishes to undertake a well-
defined research project. While the student conducts
his work under the guidance of a faculty member of
his own choosing, the project is carried out in an in-
dependent manner without regular class meetings.
Effective independent study is characterized by a re-
duction in formal instruction and an increase in the
individual student's responsibility and initiative in
the learning process.

1-3 credits hours each semester.

The above courses are used by many departmental
majors.

Anthropology

B203 Introduction to Physical Anthropology

and Archaeology
Fall Semester

An introductory survey of the principles and findings
in the fields of human paleontology, physical anthro-
pology, and archaeology.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

B205 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Spring Semester

The study of culture and its major systems, including
language, economic, political, and kinship systems.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

B305 Advanced Physical Anthropology:

Human Palaeontology
Spring, even numbered years

A study of procedures and techniques used by physi-
cal anthropologists and archaeologists in excavating,
analyzing and interpreting human skeletal remains.
Emphasis will be placed on student work with
human skeletal remains in a laboratory setting. Pre-
requisite: B203.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.



Course Descriptions



B317 Anthropology of Aging
Fall, odd numbered years

This course provides a cross-cultural perspective on
aging experiences. It explores trends which may in-
crease life satisfaction by analyzing the factors of suc-
cessful aging. Prerequisite; B316.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

B325 Culture and Personality
Fall, odd numbered years

A study of how culture affects the individual's per-
sonality with an emphasis on cross-cultural child
rearing practices, role analysis, mental illness, and
national character. Prerequisite: B205.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

B335 Selected Topics in Cultural Anthropology
Fall, even numbered years

The central emphasis in this course will be on the
topics of material culture, world view, and religion.
In addition to these regularly presented topics, cul-
tural anthropology subjects of interest to both the
professor and students will be discussed in seminar
presentations. Prerequisite: B205.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

Criminal Justice

This curriculum is designed to prepare students
for a career within the criminal justice system, to pro-
vide in-service students with knowledge and skills
needed for career advancement, and to prepare capa-
ble students for graduate school.

York College requirements and recommended
programs of study appear in another section of the
catalog; however, a student should work closely with
his advisor to tailor his program to the student's ca-
reer aspirations. A thirty-hour certificate is available
for in-ser\'ice students which consists of twenty-one
semester hours in Criminal Justice courses and nine
semester hours in Behavioral Science and Communi-
cations.

An Associate of Science degree consists of a mini-
mum of eighteen semester hours in Criminal justice
courses plus nine semester hours of B185, B161, B311.
The Bachelor of Science degree consists of twenty-seven
semester hours in Criminal Justice courses plus eight-
een semester hours of B185, B161, 6311, E220, PS241,
and PS242. An Associate degree and Minor in Crimi-
nalistics is also available.

The objectives of the Criminalistics (Evidence
Technician) program are: (1) To provide the student
with a specialized education in the criminalistics dis-
cipline, (2) To familiarize the student with the differ-
ent types and forms of physical evidence that a crimi-



nal is liable to encounter at a crime scene, (3) To
provide the student with the proper procedures for
conducting a systematic search of crime scenes for
physical evidence, (4) To provide the student with the
proper procedures for collecting, marking, preserv-
ing, packaging, and transporting the various types of
physical evidence, (5) To inform the student of the
instrumentation and methods of analysis at crime
scenes and in the crime laboratory.

The Minor study in Criminalistics consists of a
minimum of fifteen semester hours in Criminal Jus-
tice and Criminalistics courses.

Details on the Criminalistics offerings can be ob-
tained from the Department Chairman, Program
Coordinator, or an Academic Advisor.

PCIOO Orientation to Criminal Justice
Fall Semester

This course is intended to acquaint the criminal jus-
tice student with those various agencies that com-
prise the criminal justice system. Guest speakers rep-
resenting city, county, state and federal agencies
present informative discussions concerning the em-
ployment qualifications, functions, and responsibili-
ties of their respective organizations. This course is
graded on a pass/fail basis.

1 class period. 1 credit hour.

PClOl Introduction to the Criminal

Justice System*
Fall-Spring Semesters

Survey of law enforcement; the role, history, devel-
opment and constitutional aspects of law enforce-
ment and public safety. A review of agencies in-
volved in the process o;' thp administration of
criminal justice.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

■PCIOl InlroducHon to the Criminal Justice System is a Prerequisite to all
Piilice Science and Corrections (PC) courses.

PCllO Juvenile Delinquency
Spring Semester

Problem ot juvenile delinquency, theories of causa-
tion and prevention programs. Police prevention pro-
gram, juvenile courts, institutional treatment, com-
munity resources for prevention, federal and state
programs.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC115 The Citizen and the Court
Spring Semester

A detailed study of legal procedures through which
the accused passes from arrest to release. There will
be an analysis of safeguards established for the pro-
tection of individual liberties.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.



83



\brk College



of Pennsylvania



PC225 Criminal Investigation
Fall Semester

This course will examine the fundamental principles
and theories of criminal investigation, with concen-
tration on the following subjects: report writing,
sources of information: witnesses, complainants, vic-
tims, observation, physical description, identifica-
tion, interviews, interrogation, modus operandi, in-
formants, surveillance, undercover techniques, crime
scene search, collection, preservation, and processing
of physical evidence; raids, arrest, search and sei-
zure, case preparation, and courtroom demeanor and
testimony.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC226 Advanced Criminal Investigation
Spring Semester

A course designed to apply the basic fundamentals of
investigation in the investigation of specific offenses;
homicide, suicide, robbery, rape and sex offenses,
burglary, larceny, narcotics, and arson. Prerequisite:
PC225.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC230 Introduction to Criminalistics
Spring Semester

An introduction to the utilization of scientific meth-
ods and instrumentation in the analysis of physical
evidence at crime scenes and in the laboratory. Topics
include: fingerprints, cast and mold development,
blood and other body fluids, hair, fibers, tool marks,
paint, glass and plastic fragments, ballistics, and spe-
cialized instrumentation.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC235 Principles of Criminal Law
Fall Semester

Substantive law of crimes is reviewed thoroughly
from its Anglo-American common law origins and
compared with the new Pennsylvania Crimes Code.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC237 Law of Criminal Evidence
Spring Semester

A detailed study of the laws by which criminal evi-
dence is admissible into Court trials, including bur-
den of proof, relevance, opinion and hearsay rules,
and other vital aspects of legal proof. Prerequisite:
PC235.

PC245 The Police and the Community
Fall Semester

An in-depth study of the police subculture with
major emphasis on their role and function as well as
the sociological and psychological behavioral patterns
of police officers. Community perception of the po-



lice, including the effects of prejudice, discrimina-
tion, discretion, and the concepts of contemporary
police-community relations programs will be exam-
ined.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC255 Police Operational Functions
Fall Semester

A comprehensive analysis of the organization, func-
tion, and current trends of police operations pertain-
ing to patrol, investigations, vice and narcotics.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC320 (PC330) Forensic Microscopic Techniques
Fall Semester

Microscopic methods of scientific analysis are used in
the comparison and identification of physical evi-
dence. This includes fingerprints and latent prints,
impressions and casts, tools and toolmarks, hairs,
fibers, rope, and cloth. The value of this type of evi-
dence and its presentation in court are discussed.
Prerequisite: PC230.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC321 (PC331) Forensic Macroanalysis
Spring Semester

Methods of scientific analysis are used in the compari-
son and identification of physical evidence which in-
clude weapons, bullets and cartridges, bombs and
explosives, fires, glass, and documents. Forensic
photography is also covered. The value of this type of
evidence and its presentation in court are discussed.
Prerequisite: PC230.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC322 (PC332) Forensic Biochemical Analysis
Fall Semester

Methods of scientific analysis are used in the compar-
ison and identification of physical evidence which
includes blood, body fluids, blood alcohol, toxicologi-
cal substances, drugs, paints, plastics, and soil. The
value of this type of evidence and its presentation in
court are discussed. Prerequisite: PC230.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC335 Community Corrections
Fall Semester

Introductory course to non-institutional treatment of
offenders including the correctional places, proba-
tion, parole, supervision, legal aspects and research.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC341 Law of Criminal Procedure
Spring Semester

A detailed study of the laws of arrest and search as
affected by recent decisions of the United States Su-
preme Court and various state appellate courts, in-



84



Course Descriptions




eluding Pennsylvania Supreme and Superior Courts.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC346 Correctional Administration
Fall, even numbered years

The study and evaluation of theories and procedures
relevant to the administration of the probation, insti-
tutional and parole components of corrections.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC350 Principles of Crime Scene Search
Fall Semester

An in-depth examination of crime scene search in-
cluding: preservation of the scene; note taking; pre-
liminar}' examination and detailed search methods
and procedures; sketching; measurements; photogra-
phy; collection, marking, packaging, and transport-
ing physical evidence to the laboratory. Prerequisite:
PC225'and PC230,

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC352 (PC240) Police Organization and

Management
Fall Semester

This course will examine the basic principles of orga-
nization and management. Federal, state, county,
and municipal law enforcement agencies will be re-
viewed and compared with gox'ernment and business
administration. The important areas of leadership,
planning discipline and contemporary police man-
agement problems will be analyzed.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.



PC360 Criminal Justice Practicum
Fall-Spring Semesters

A carefully planned program that provides actual
on-the-job experience. Agencies are carefully selected
that will provide a variety of experiences of educa-
tional value. The student will spend 120 hours with a
selected criminal justice agency plus conferences with
the supervising professor. Prerequisite: Junior stand-
ing, 2.0 GPA, and permission of instructor.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC401 Law of Corrections
Fall Semester

A study of legal procedures which affect the liberties
of inmates, and duties of correctional staff within the
institutional and community setting.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC465 Traffic Administration and

Investigation
Fall Semester

An integration of the four "E's" of traffic administra-
tion — Engineering, Education, Enforcement and
Enactment. Stress is placed on a smooth, efficient
flow of traffic while maximizing safety and minimiz-
ing deaths, personal injury and property damage.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC470 Selected Topics in
Law Enforcement

A seminar in the field of law enforcement which will
deal with specific areas of concern to practitioners,
students, and interested community members.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC480 Institutional Corrections
Spring Semester

A study of the court and jury system, probation and
parole, individual case studies, correctional institu-
tions, allied agencies and resources, and the State
Correctional Program.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC490 Selected Topics in Corrections
Spring, odd numbered years

A seminar in the correctional field which will deal
with specific areas of concern to both practitioners,
students, and interested community members.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

PC498, PC499 Independent Study

The Independent Study Program affords an opportu-
nity for the student who wishes to undertake a well-
defined research project. While the student conducts
his work under the guidance of a faculty member of
his own choosing, the project is carried out in an in-



85



\brk College



of Pennsylvania



dependent manner without regular class meetings.
Effective independent study is characterized by a re-
duction in formal instruction and an increase in the
individual student's responsibility and initiative in
the learning process.

1-3 credit hours each semester.

Criminalistics (Evidence Technician)

The criminalistics courses allow the student to
pursue course work in this field of law enforcement.
The objectives of the minor are: (1) To provide the
student with a specialized education in the criminal-
istics discipline, (2) To familiarize the student with
the different types and forms of physical evidence
that a criminalist is liable to encounter at a crime
scene, (3) To provide the student with the proper pro-
cedures for conducting a systematic search of crime
scenes for physical evidence, (4) To provide the stu-
dent with the proper procedures for collecting, mark-
ing, preserving, packaging, and transporting the var-
ious types of physical evidence, (5) To inform the
student of the instrumentation and methods of analy-
sis at crime scenes and in the crime laboratory.

Gerontology

The following courses are being offered to students
who wish to develop some specialization in the field
of adulthood and aging (gerontology). These courses
will provide basics in the methods, research, and
knowledge in the field, will inspire "disciplined curi-
osity" for future developments, will provide experi-
ences in the present realities of the aging, and con-
front personal attitudes toward aging and death.

B316 Adulthood and Aging
Spring Semester

A course on the developmental analysis of the
changes during the life span in vocational, family and
emotional development. Prerequisite: B161.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

B318 Social Aspects of Aging
Fall, even numbered years

A study of the traumatic changes in the social envi-
ronment of the individual brought about by aging. It
will include consideration of financial, legal, emo-
tional, social contact and family factors. Prerequisite:
B161, B316.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

B373 Working with the Elderly
Fall Semester

This course will focus on the skills needed to work
successfully with older persons. It will emphasize
knowing the client, knowing the available support



systems, and helping with the decision-making proc-
ess to encourage independence and adequate care.
Prerequisite: 8316.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

8374 Final Separation: Death and Grief
Spring Semester

This course is a brief survey of thanatology with em-
phasis on the personal meaning of death and helping
with the adjustments of separation.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

8445 Psychobiology of Aging
Spring, even numbered years

A survey of the known physiological changes of the
aging process and their psychological consequences.
Present research in cellular, immunological, percep-
tual and neurological changes will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: B316, BSIOO.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

8450, 8451 Practicum in Aging
Fall-Spring Semesters

This course provides on-the-job experience in the
application of the Behavioral Sciences. The student
spends a minimum of 120 hours per semester in
meaningful service to a provider of services for the
elderly, and in developing and sustaining programs
to meet the needs of the growing older population. It
is supervised by careful coordination of Agency and
College personnel. Prerequisite: B316 and permission
of instructor.

1 class period, 120 hours work.

3 credits each semester.

Long-Term Care Administration

8277 Practicum in Long-Term Care Administration

Provides early field experience by placement with a
long-term care facility under the supervision of an
approved administrator. The student will spend 120
hours in various departments in the institution, and
will meet in periodic class sessions. Prerequisite:
Sophomore major.
3 credit hours.

8431, 8432, 8433 Administrator-in-Training

A carefully planned program to provide in-depth
experience (with cooperating facilities) in all aspects
of long-term care administration. Supplemental semi-
nars, reports and appraisals — credit awarded will be
based on length and scope of each program. Prereq-
uisite: Senior major with coordinator's approval.

12 or 15 credit hours. (B431— 6 cr., B432— 6 cr.,

B433— 3 cr.)



Course Descriptions



Psychology

Psychology is the science of behavior and the
functioning of the individual personality-

A major in psychology is designed to provide
preparation for pursuing graduate study and/or entry
into vocations where psychological training is desira-
ble (i.e., social agencies, personnel work, govern-
ment institutions, and industry).

Courses in psychology provide for the needs of
additional students in other majors such as nursing,


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Online LibraryYork College of PennsylvaniaYork College of Pennsylvania (Volume 1985-1986, Vol. 42) → online text (page 10 of 23)