York College of Pennsylvania.

York College of Pennsylvania (Volume 1985-1986, Vol. 42) online

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3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS221 Botany
Fall Semester

An introduction to the evolution, structure, function,
ecology and classification of non-vascular and vascu-
lar plants. Cellular, tissue and physiological princi-
ples will be stressed. Prerequisite: BSlll.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.



BS222 Plant Taxonomy and Seasonal Flora
Spring, even numbered years/Mini-mester

A study of the flowering plants of southeastern Penn-
sylvania with emphasis upon collection, identifica-
tion and ecological relationships.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS241 Microbiology
Fall-Spring Semesters

An introduction to general microbiology for allied
health, nursing and biology majors. Topics include
the morphology, physiology, metabolism, taxonomy
and genetics of microorganisms. The theoretical and
practical aspects of bacterial containment and immu-
nology will be covered. Virology, disease processes
and applied areas are covered as time permits. Pre-
requisite: BSlll or departmental approval.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS242 Genetics
Spring Semester

The basic principles of genetics-chromosome theory,
mechanisms and heredity; the chemistry and interac-
tions of nucleic acids and proteins; gene action and
control of cytodifferentiation and development.
Prerequisite: BSlll.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS301 Animal Physiology
Fall Semester

A study of general physiological principles demon-
strated by select major animal groups. These princi-
ples are related to organisms' adaptations to their
environment. Laboratory exercises with stress
"hands-on" experiences, utilizing modern modular
physiographs. Prerequisite: BSlll and one year of
chemistry.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS302 Immunology
Spring Semester

An introduction to the broad field of immunology,
including topics such as immunity, serology, immu-
nochemistry and immunobiology. Prerequisite:
BSlll, BS241.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.



York College



of Pennsylvania



BS311 Advanced Zoology
To be announced

The classification, ecology, physiology and distribu-
tion of selected animal groups will be studied in some
detail. Laboratory will be taxonomically oriented in-
doors and ecologically oriented outdoors with empha-
sis probably placed on Pennsylvania taxa. Pre-
requisite: BS211.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS321 Advanced Botany
To be announced

A study of selected principles of plant physiology and
their application to the laboratory study of selected
plant organisms. Also, a study of variation in struc-
ture and form of the major plant groups (nonvascu-
lar, vascular) with emphasis placed on life cycles of
selected organisms. Prerequisite: BS221.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS322 Plant Morphology
To be announced

A study of variation in structure and form of the
major plant groups (nonvascular, vascular) with
emphasis placed on life cycles of selected organisms.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS331 Terrestrial Ecology
Spring, odd numbered years

What are the major natural land ecosystems of Penn-
sylvania, North America, and the World? What are
the principal ecological forces shaping these ecosys-
tems? What has man's effect been on these forces?
What do the plants and animals of an ecosystem re-
veal about that ecosystem? The answers to these
questions will form the basis for this course with the
last question being addressed in the field experi-
ences. Prerequisite: BS211 and S265.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.



BS342 Applied Aquatic Ecology
Spring, even numbered years

An introduction to the organisms characteristic of
freshwaters with an emphasis on macroinvertebrates
and fishes. Experiences in field and laboratory tech-
niques of collection, identification and preservation
win be related to practical application to gain under-
standing of the total aquatic community under both
natural evolution and the influence of man. Prerequi-
site: BS2n, BS221, and S265.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS402 Biochemistry
Fall Semester

An introduction to the molecules of biological signifi-
cance, with emphasis on molecular control processes,
energetics, and biochemical methodology. Aspects of
nutrition and metabolic diseases are included. Pre-
requisite: BSlll, S121, 5122, S232.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

BS411 Practical Biological Internship
Fall-Spring Semesters

Designed to expose the student to the reality of a bio-
logical field through direct participation. This may
involve experience as a lab assistant, assistance with
the research of a faculty member, or participation in
off-campus workshops or employment. Prerequisite:
Departmental approval.
1 to 4 credit hours.

BS412 Seminar in Biology
Fall Semester '

This course involves an in-depth study of some topic
in biology. The student selects, designs, executes,
and presents, in both written and oral form, the re-
sults of his study to his peers and the department.
Lectures deal with major literature of biology and its
use, the conveying of information to others, curricu-
lum vitae preparation and other pertinent topics. A
second track will allow biology education majors an
opportunity to work with a fully certified high school
biology teacher for a portion of the semester. BSCS
series will be explored and various teaching methods
will be demonstrated. Prerequisite: Departmental ap-
proval.

1 three-hour class period.

3 credit hours.



94



Course Descriptions



BS413, BS414 Undergraduate Research
By arrangement

Individual problems pursued by qualified students
under supervision of a member of the biology faculty,
designed to develop proficiency in biological re-
search. Meetings and credits to be arranged as
required.

Two semesters.

1-3 credit hours per semester.

BS421 Advanced Seasonal Flora

Advanced Seasonal Flora is intended for those stu-
dents who have completed one semester of Seasonal
Flora at York College or its equivalent from another
institution. Emphasis will be placed on collecting,
identifying, and making herbarium vouchers of local
flora. Prerequisite: BS222 or permission of instructor.

3 class periods.

1 three-hour laboratory period.

4 credit hours.

Health Record Administration

The Health Record AdministraHon Program pre-
pares the student for a professional career in a variety
of health care settings as a manager of health infor-
mation. The Health Record Administrator is respon-
sible for the development and maintenance of a mul-
tifaceted health record system that is capable of
providing the data needed by the Patient, Health
Care Professionals, Administration, the Community,
Medical Researchers and Educators.

Admission to York College does not guarantee
admission to the Health Record Administration Pro-
gram. Class size is limited and entrance into the pro-
fessional courses will be granted to those students
who have earned a cumulative grade point average of
2.5 or better, a minimum 2.0 in each of the supporting
courses and have demonstrated qualities essential to
this health care field. Special application is made to
the Dean of Academic Affairs after completion of 60
credit hours.

Transfer students and applicants with degrees in
other fields will be accepted on a limited basis. Junior
transfer students or students having a Baccalaureate
Degree are expected to have completed sixteen hours
of science, including Anatomy and Physiology, as
well as required supporting courses.

All didactic courses will be taught at the York
College campus. Clinical experiences are offered
through supen.'ised affiliation assignments at area
hospitals and other health care institutions. Students
are responsible for travel to and from these sites as
well as expenses incurred during the clinical experi-
ences.



The Health Record Administration Program is
accredited by the American Medical Association
Committee on Allied Health Education and Accredi-
tation in collaboration with the American Medical
Record Association. Following satisfactory comple-
tion of all courses required, the student will be
awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Health
Record Administration. Graduates will be eligible to
write the registration examination of the American
Medical Record Association.

HRIOO Orientation to Health Record

Administration
Fall Semester

The course is designed to give the student a basic
understanding of the responsibilities, professional
relationships, future trends, and career opportunities
within Health Record Administration.
1 class period. 1 credit hour.

HR215 Medical Terminology
Fall-Spring Semesters

The course is designed to enable the student to accu-
rately spell and define common medical terms related
to major disease processes, diagnostic procedures,
laboratory tests, abbreviations, drugs, and treatment
modalities.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

HR310 Directed Practice I
Mini Mester

This is a supervised learning experience that enables
the student to become aware of the services and cleri-
cal functions of the medical record department. The
student learns to work with the personnel of the rec-
ord department and is also exposed to the signifi-
cance of the health record.

60 clinical hours. 1 credit hour.

HR312 Organization and Administration of

Health Care Facilities
Spring Semester

The role of the hospital in health care delivery. An
overview of the health care delivery system in the
U.S. today including the history, current trends and
future goals is the focus of this course. The role of the
hospital in health care as well as objectives and orga-
nizational structure of various health care facilities is
emphasized. Guest lectures by prominent local
health care professionals are an integral part of this
course.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.



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of Pennsylvania



HR313 Health Record Science
Spring Semester

The historical background and value of the health
record; health record content and format; numbering
and filing systems; retention requirements; health
record accreditation standards; and various health
record processing functions are studied.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

HR315 Quality Assurance in Health Care
Fall Semester

This course introduces the development, philoso-
phy and purpose of quality assurance in health care,
discusses principles and techniques of utilization re-
view and medical audit, and interprets PSRO and
JCAH regulations as they apply to quality assurance
activities.

2 class periods. 2 credit hours.

HR409 Directed Practice II
Fall Semester

The course gives the student exposure to the techni-
cal and professional functions of the medical record
department through supervised assignments at med-
ical record departments in the area. The formation of
the health record in various departments is observed.
120 clinical hours. 2 credit hours.

HR410 Directed Practice III
Spring Semester

The course exposes the student to health records in
other types of facilities such as extended care facili-
ties, mental health centers and home care programs.
Other student assignments are structured so that
experience is gained in health record practice studied
in the classroom.

60 clinical hours. 1 credit hour.

HR411 Health Record Management Affiliation
Spring Semester

This course is a 6-week planned and supervised work
experience with a registered record administrator of
an affiliated medical record department, for the pur-
pose of gaining experience in department manage-
ment.

4 credit hours.

HR412 Health Record Management
Fall Semester

This course presents an integration of basic health
record science principles with the fundamental man-
agement process of planning, organizing, controlling
and staffing. Student is given an opportunity to de-
velop management skills by designing a medical rec-
ord department, role-playing, case studies and
management projects.

4 class periods. 4 credit hours.



HR413 Health Classifications, Indexes,

and Registers
Fall Semester

Principles and techniques of health record practices
related to coding and indexing of diseases and opera-
tions, with a variety of classifications; compiling and
maintaining secondary record indexes and registers
are studied.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

HR414 Health Statistics and Research
Spring Semester

Principles and techniques of health statistics. Vital
and Public Health statistics; sources, definition, col-
lection, and reporting of statistics; presentation and
qualitative analysis of data; sources and uses of
health data in the United States; research methodolo-
gies are explored.

3 class periods. 4 credit hours.

HR415, HR416 Fundamentals of Medical Science
Fall/Spring Semester

An introductory course to medical science, emphasiz-
ing the disease processes affecHng the human body
via an integrated approach to specific disease entities,
including the study of causes, diagnosis and treat-
ment of diseases.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours/semester.

HR417 Legal Concepts for the Health Field
Fall Semester

This course introduces the law, administration of the
law, legal aspects of hospital and medical staff orga-
nization, release of information and legal actions re-
quiring evidence from health records, confidential
communications, and consents and authorizations.
3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

HR418 Health Record Administration Seminar
Spring Semester

A course focused upon the integration of all aspects
of the student's health record experience. Selected
topics are discussed as they relate to the identifica-
tion, evaluation, and solution of various types of pro-
fessional and administrative problems encountered
by the health record administrator.
2 credit hours.

HR419 Health Records in Specialized

Health Care Facilities
Spring Semester

Exploration of the different techniques and systems
of health record practices in extended care facilities,
psychiatric institutions, ambulatory care settings,
physician offices, and home care programs is under-
taken.

1 class weekly. 1 credit hour.



Course Descriptions



HR420 Systems Analysis
Spring Semester

The course is intended to develop an understanding
of basic system concepts of fact gathering, recording,
fact analysis techniques as well as implementation
and managing system changes.

1 class period. 1 credit hour.

HR427 Health Information Systems
Spring Semester

Data processing systems and applications of auto-
mated techniques to the handling of information in
health care inshtutions are studied with emphasis on
needs of health record services.

3 class periods. 3 credit hours.

HR498 Independent Study

This course is designed to give the student an oppor-
tunity to undertake a well-defined research project or
management affiliation of his or her choice. The stu-
dent would conduct his work under a faculty mem-
ber.

1-3 credits.

Nuclear Medicine Technology

The Nuclear Medicine Technology Major will
prepare the Student for a professional career as a nu-
clear medicine technologist. Nuclear medicine is a
specialty area of medical practice that uses radioachve
substances and special sensitive instrumentation to
help diagnose and treat certain diseases. This spe-
cialty is directed by a nuclear physician who has re-
ceived added training beyond medical school in the
proper use and handling of radioactive substances.
The nuclear medicine technologist is an individual
who has received special training to perform the
many patient procedures which will assist the nuclear
physician in his diagnosis and treatment. The indi-
vidual is trained in the special instrumentation used
to perform body function studies, imaging proce-
dures, and special laboratory tests done on various
body fluids (such as blood samples). Upon successful
completion of the program and the registry examina-
tion of Nuclear Medicine Technology, the individual
is certified as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist.

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science De-
gree in Nuclear Medicine Technology will spend
three years at York College followed by a Clinical year
at one of the affiliated hospitals of the South Central
Pennsylvania Consortium for Nuclear Medicine Tech-
nology Training.* Admission to York College does
not guarantee admission to the hospital Clinical year.
Students will follow the prescribed courses of study
for the first three years at the College. The student



must earn a minimum of "C" in each of the required
supporting courses and nuclear medicine technology
major courses with an average of 2.3 in science and
mathematics as well as a cumulative grade point av-
erage of 2.3 in order for the College to recommend
the student for the Clinical year. At the beginning of
the Spring semester of the junior year the student will
make application for the Clinical year through the
Coordinator of Allied Health at the College. The Co-
ordinator of Allied Health will present applications
and transcripts of all students' records who are ap-
plying for the Clinical year to the Advisory Commit-
tee of the Consortium. The Advisory Committee will
decide which students can be accepted into the Clini-
cal year and will also designate the hospital assign-
ment. The students will be notified when the selec-
tion process is completed. The students will then be
required to complete application to the specific hospi-
tal with all necessary forms and payment of prelimi-
nary fees.

The Clinical year begins in August and is twelve
months in duration. Four days per week are devoted
to clinical practice and one day per week is spent in
classroom instruction. This may involve commuting
one day a week to one of the affiliated hospitals.

Upon successful completion of the Nuclear Med-
icine Technology Program a Bachelor of Science de-
gree in Nuclear Medicine from York College and a
Certificate in Nuclear Medicine Technology from the
Consortium will be awarded. This qualifies the indi-
vidual to take one of the three national registry ex-
aminations** in order to become a Certified Nuclear
Medicine Technologist.

In addition, an individual with Special Training
from another field or another degree such as Medical
Technology, Nursing, Biology etc., may apply for the
Clinical year as a student with advanced status. This
individual would receive a certificate after success-
fully completing the program and would also be eligi-
ble to take one of the national registry examinations
for Certified Nuclear Medicine Technologists.

вАҐThe affiliated hospitals are 1 larrisbur); Hospital, Lancaster General Hospi-
tal, York Hospital and Memorial Hospital.
"Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB), American
Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). American Society of Clinical
Pathologists Registry Exam (ASCP)

NMlOl Nuclear Medicine Theory

This course reviews the history of nuclear physics,
structure of matter, atomic radiation processes, inter-
actions of radiation with matter, and radiation biol-
ogy. In addition to lectures, seminars, assigned read-
ing, and audiovisual programs are included.
4 credit hours.



97



\brk College



of Pennsylvania



NM102 Nuclear Medicine Theory

This course reviews Nuclear Medicine instrumenta-
tion, computer appHcations, and radiopharmaceu-
ticals. In addition to lectures, seminars, assigned
reading and audiovisual programs are included. Pre-
requisite: NM 101.
4 credit hours.

NMlll Nuclear Medicine Applied Theory

These lectures review the applications of the theoreti-
cal concepts of physics to the performance of studies,
safety requirements, NRC rules and regulations, and
administration and management of a nuclear medi-
cine department.
1 credit hour.

NM112 Nuclear Medicine Applied Theory

Continuation of NMlll. Prerequisite: NMlll
1 credit hour.

NM113 Nuclear Medicine Applied Theory

Continuation of NM112. Prerequisite: NM112

1 credit hour.

NM121 Nuclear Medicine Clinical
Applications

All nuclear medicine studies (in vivo and in vitro) are
reviewed in detail. This includes review of mathe-
matical concepts, statistics and the application of nu-
clear medicine to the diagnosis and treatment of dis-
ease.

2 credit hours.

NM122 Nuclear Medicine Clinical
Applications

Continuation of NM121
2 credit hours

NM123 Nuclear Medicine Clinical
Applications

Continuation of NM122. A field trip to Penn State
University, Breazeale Nuclear Reactor Facility, Uni-
versity Park, PA, in conducted in the spring of each
year.

2 credit hours.

NM131, NM132, NM133 Nuclear Medicine
Practicum

Preceptorial instruction in theory, practical aspects,
calculations and techniques of studies performed in
nuclear medicine laboratories will be provided in ro-
tation:



a.


In Vitro


8 weeks


b.


Uptake unit & rectilinear






scanner


8 weeks


c.


Gamma Cameras and computer


16 weeks


d.


Radiochemistry


8 weeks



e. Patient evaluation &

Administration 8 weeks

f. Elective 2 weeks

13 credit hours.

Respiratory Therapy

The Respiratory Therapy Programs prepare the
student for a professional career as a respiratory tech-
nician or a respiratory therapist. Respiratory therapy
is an allied health specialty instrumental in the diag-
nosis, treatment, management, and preventive care
of patients with cardiopulmonary problems. Often
defined as the fastest growing allied health profes-
sion, respiratory therapy offers persons interested in
caring for others an opportunity to serve as vital
members of the health care team.

Applicants to the respiratory therapy programs
must have graduated from an approved high school
or have earned a state equivalency diploma and must
exhibit evidence of a strong background in a college
preparatory program. A minimum "C" average is
required in high school biology, chemistry and alge-
bra. Applicants must tour a respiratory therapy de-
partment. Applicants will be asked to attend an inter-
view with the Respiratory Therapy Program Director,
Clinical Coordinator, and Medical Director. Deadline
for application to the program is January 15th. Size of
the freshman and sophomore classes is limited.
Transfer students will be considered for admission to
the respiratory therapy program on an individual
basis.

Respiratory Therapy students should be pre-
pared for expenses in addition to those identified as
tuition, fees, and room and board costs. Most addi-
tional expenses relate to costs for uniforms, supplies
such as stethoscope, medical insurance, text books,
membership in professional organizations and other
supplies.

Classroom, laboratory, and clinical facilities at
the York Hospital will be utilized for the respiratory
therapy courses. Students will also receive clinical
education at secondary clinical affiliates. Students
will be responsible for their own transportation to
and from respiratory therapy classes, laboratories,
and clinical experience.

Successful completion of the Respiratory Techni-
cian Program qualifies the individual to take the Cer-
tified Respiratory Therapy Technician (CRTT) exami-
nation administered by the National Board for
Respiratory Care (NBRC). Successful completion of
the Respiratory Therapist Program qualifies the indi-
vidual to take the CRTT and Registered Respiratory
Therapist (RRT) examinations administered by the



Course Descriptions



NBRC. "Successful completion" is defined as a mini-
mum of a "C" or better in all courses.

The clinical courses in respiratory therapy may
not be scheduled according to conventional semester
scheduling and may include clinical scheduling dur-
ing evenings, nights, and weekends.

Both the respirators' technician and respiratory
therapist programs are fully accredited by the Ameri-
can Medical Association.

RTIOO Basic Science for Respiratory Therapy

A sur\'ey of basic scientific principles as applied to the
practice of respiratory therapy. Included are respira-
tor\' terminology, scientific measure, fluid physics,
gas phvsics, basic electricity, chemical and physical
properties of matter, basic genetics, basic microbiol-


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Online LibraryYork College of PennsylvaniaYork College of Pennsylvania (Volume 1985-1986, Vol. 42) → online text (page 12 of 23)