Copyright
Z Harrison.

Description of the Cincinnati southern railway from Cincinnati to Chattanooga ... Giving its history and a general description of the towns and villages, bridges, tunnels, &c. through which it passes; description and resources of the country, and a general guide to business houses and places of inte online

. (page 1 of 21)
Online LibraryZ HarrisonDescription of the Cincinnati southern railway from Cincinnati to Chattanooga ... Giving its history and a general description of the towns and villages, bridges, tunnels, &c. through which it passes; description and resources of the country, and a general guide to business houses and places of inte → online text (page 1 of 21)
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Cincinnati, 0.



SPENCER &CRAI&PI?INTI|Mr WORKS.




Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1878,

By Spencer & Craig Printixg Woeks,

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



CINCINNATI ADVERTISEMENTS.



I.




I. & E. GREENWALD,

348 Ea^l Pearl Nfreel, CiiiciiiBiuli, Ohio.

Steam Engines 1 Flour Mill Machinery,

Grist Mills, Smut Machines, Flour Packers, Shafting & Hangers,
pULLEYg, ^YhEEL^ and ^ILL ^{^EARlf^iQ

OF ^lIj sizes, ^IsTID

Mosler, Bahmann& Co.,

FIRE AND BURGLAR-PROOF



■i








»



FAULTS AI^D LOCKS,



Elm, Water and Front Streets,

CINCINNATI, - - OHIO,



J ,

Zr. CINCINNATI ADVERTISEMENT.



The Finest, Cleanest, Cheapest Place in

the City,







I



A HOTBL DINNER



P^OI^



On TWENiy-FIVE CENTS, 25c.



FK,0]VI

TWELVE TO TWO O'CLOCK P. M.,

The Neat Dining Parlors of the Paris of America,
No. 174 "W. Fourth St.,

CINCINNATI, O.

COL. J. C. CRANE, Caterer.



DESCRI PTION




FROM CINCINNATI TO CHATTANOOQA.



%%%






GIVING ITS HISTORY AND A GENERAL DESCRIPTON OF THE

TOWNS AND VILLAGES,

(B P^J QG- EH, TujSfJTELB, &^C.

TUliOUGH WhlCH IT PASSES; DESCRIPTION AND RESOURCES
OF THF. COUNTRY, AND A GENERAL

Guide to Business Houses

AND PLACES OF INTEREST IN CINCINNATI,

AND POINTS ON THE

SOUTHERN RAILWAY.



ARRANGED AND COMPILED BY Z. HARRISON.






C I N C I N|N A T I :
Spencer & Craig Printing Works, 169 and 171 Race Street,



Jt



(-4 ^-^

. %

IV. , CINCINNATI ADVEBTtS£!MENT.

CHARLES STEWART,



3^«d:^I^^XT:FJLCTTJR,:E3I^ & lDE3Ji.IiER TIST



PAPER. BLANK BOOKS



j^isriD



STAPLE STATIONERY.



Paper of any Size and Weight made to

Order.

141 & 143 Walnut Street,



CINCINNATI, O.



CINCINNATI ADVERTISEMENTS.



JOHN CHURCH & CO.,

Sheet Music and Music Books,



AND DEALERS IN



AND ALL KINDS OP



Musical Merchandise.

We make a specialty of Sabbith School and Church Music Books. Any
piece of Music or Music Book, no matter where published, sent by mail,
post-paid, upon receipt of the retail price.

BY THE MONTH, QUAKTER OR YEAR,

AND LET

The Rent Pay for Them.

Our stock of Small Instruments is most complete, and as we import
direct, we are able to give our customers the benefit of manufacturers'
prices. Descriptive Catalogues and Price Lists, free.

Address, JOHN CHURCH & CO., Cincinnati, O.

Send stamp for specimen copy of Church's Musical Visitor.




Flllilll




MORSE and



13Q AValnut Street.



CINCINNATI,



OHIO.



CINCINNATI ADVERTISEMENTS.



O. XjITJVJCESR. dks OO.



MANUFACTURERS OP




Lard Oil, Stearine and Refined Lard.

Cor. SYCAMORE & FRONT STS., CINCINNATI, O.



GEO. E JACKSON & CO.,



GENERAL



Cominissioii Merchants.

No, 52 Walnut Street,
CINCINNATI, - OHIO.



J". ^W^LICEiE?. & CO.,

Brewers and Bottlers of

ifklLJB and POB.TBII,

385 Sycamore St., Cincinnati, 0.
Also Lager Beer in bottles.



GREENWALD & SCHOTT,

Proprietors

AVhite Clond IVIills.

264 Broadway, (near 8th st.)

Cash Paid for Wheat & Rye. CINCINNATI, 0.






- hi



I

* JWBAIPRIDGE&CO I %

0. rf.0 rr O fc^



O". T77", :B.ia.XjT3I2.XX)a-E c5c CO.,
MamifacturtTsand dealers in everv variety of Saws,
Moulding bits. Planing Knives, Leather and Gum
Belting, etc. All kinds of Repairing, Orindintr and
Polishingdone. Saws Gnmnied and Hammered in
the best manner. No. 9 Vine St., Cincinnati, O.



A. J. LONGINOTTI,

Druggist and Apothecary,

A nd dealer in Foreign and Domestic Toilet
and FANCY ABTICI.ES

N. K. COK. PLUM & LONGWORTH STREETS,
Cincinnati, Ohio.



PREFACE.



'HE opening of the Cincinnati Southern Railway marks
an epoch in the history of Cincinnati, the magnitude of

'Y which is not fully realized. We compute in figures the g??or-
mouscost of the road but overlook the immense developments being
made by this grand highway of public travel. In Ohio and Ind-
iana on the north and leading directly to Cincinnati, are 6,000
miles of railway, south of Tennessee and converging there are
4,000 miles ; and this railway will be as the neck between them.
It is estimated that the extent of country which will thereby
become a market for our manulactures, and from which we
shall draw its special products, embraces an area ot about 200,
000 square miles, equal to four times the State of New York.
In this vast territory there are a number of cities and large
towns with no eastern or northern city so accessible as Cin-
cinnati.

We have undertaken to collect and arrange from statistics
and various other authentic sources, a brief but interesting
history of Cincinnati, the Cincinnati Southern Railway and
notable points on its line. We have quoted freely from Mr.
Collins' excellent work on Kentucky, J. B. Killebrew's "Re-
sources of Tennessee," and from various reports, &c., issued
by the Board of Trustees.

We have embellished the work with numerous illustrations
and engravings of places of interest in Cincinnati, and along
the route.

The frequent delays caused by the want of prompt legislation .
and the heavy character of construction, have combined to post-
pone the completion of the road. On this account we fiave
delayed the publication of our work until the question should
be definitely decided, and work under way.

Believing that a great want has been met, we submit this
work to the public.

SPENCER & CRAIG.

Cincinnati, May 1, 1878.



VL CINCINNATI ADVERTISEMENT.

Great Beduetion in Priees. Largely Increasing Sales. The Singer Still Triumpliant.



THE Sfflffl MAN! ACmiNE CO.



WAS THE FIRST TO MAKE



THE GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES !

AND ARE NOW SELLING THEIR

" NEW FAMILY MACHINE "

, — AT —

TUrtj Dollars Less llan llie Former Price !

Also all their Machines in Proportion, the quality being maintained at the
highest standard. Purchasers should beware of spurious Machines, which are so inferior
as to bear little relation to the original except in genei'al appearance — all that exact adapt-
ability and finish of parts, so necessary to the perfect working of, and found only in the
genuine Machines, being wanted or imperfectly executed by irresponsible makers, who
lack the elaborate but specially adapted and very costly machinery necessary for the pro-
duction of the delicate parts of a well constructed and reliable Sewing Machine.

The works of the Singer Manufacturing Comp4NY, at Elizabethport, are capable
of turning out over a thousand Machines a day ; those in Glasgow, wScotland. now pro-
ducing six hundred Machines a day, are about to be enlarged ; while their extensive cab-
inet works in South Bend, Indiana, furnish the elegant cabinet Singer cases to be^found
in so many boudoirs all over the civilized world. With sucli works, and all their mar-
vellous automa'ic machinery invented for, and exclusively used in the manufacture of
that little instrument indispensable in every well-regulated household — with such works
and machinery — whose money value amounts to millions of dollars — but, above all, not
forgetting the incalculable intelligence of an army of agents all over the world, most of
whom have been specially educated in the business, it would be absurd to assume that
with such powers the irresponsible makers o^' spurious Machines can^ever compete, either
as. regards production or sale.

The purchaser, therefore, will find it to his advantage to select the Genuine Machine,
which may be known by the patented Trade Mark and the name, The Singer Manu-
facturing Company, printed distinctly on the arm of the ilachine. The popularity of
the Singer was shown by the exhibition of the Two Millionth Machine at the Centennial
(over Two Million Machines had then been sold), as well as by the tables of sales of the
principal makers, published from year to year, which show that the Singer is still trium-
phant, and — as the sales are a criterion — the public regard it, after an experience of over
a quarter of a century, as the most complete and practical of all Sewing Machines.



PURCHASE FROM AUTHORIZED AGENTS ONLY.



PRINCIPAL OFFICE: 34 UNION SQUARE, N. Y.
BR^AIVOH OFFICE s

No. 61 WEST FOURTH STREET, CINCINNATI, 0.



CW GIN 2^ ATI ADVERTISEMENT. VII.



Established _ - - ISl^



F. H. LAWSON & CO.,



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN



Tin Plate, Copper, Sheet Iron,



STAMPED & JAPANNED TIN WARE,



CRANITE IRON WARE,



THE BEST ENAMELED WARE MADE.



Tinners' Tools &* Machines, &c.,



188 & 190 MAIN STREET,



Cincinnati, Ohio.



nil.



CINGINNA TI AB VER TISEMENTS.



CHAI^ImBNGB



j3i^.A.r<iJi>



Canned FruitsaVegetables,

PICKLES, PIG'S FEET, JELLIES, &C.,

R. M. DENHAM & CO.,

PACKERS,



Kleine, Detmer & Co.,



Importers & Wholesale Dealers in



CLOTHS,



CASSIMERES, VESTINGS



97 WEST THIRD ST.,

(Opp. Burnet House,)

CINCINNATI, - OHIO



BLACK & CLAWSON,

GENERAL MACHINISTS,

Manufacturers and
Grinders of

Calendar Rolls.

Rolls for any pur-
rose made to order.
MilL« for grinding
Paints, Coach Col-
ors and Printers'
Inks.

For particulars
address

Black &. Clawson,
Hamilton, 0.



BUCKEYE BELL FOUNDRY.

Bstablisbed in 1837.
Superior Bells of Copper atid Tin, mounted
with the best Rotary Hangings, .or Churches,
Schools, Farms, Factories, Court-houses, Fire
Alarms, Toiver ClocJis. etc- Fully Warranted.

Illufiiratcd C;italog:ie sent Free.
Vamii.-7.kn * Tift. lOJ K. 2.1 St., Cincinnati.



Spencer & Craig Printing Works,

PRINTERS,





1S9 & 171 S&ce Street, CiBcianati, 0.




PUBLIC LIBRARY.



INTRODUCTORY.



A railway from Cincinnati to the South was at first proposed as an outlet
from the Ohio Valley to the south eastern Sea-board. Two large systems of
railroads have grownup in the South, that of the south-eastern Sea-board, tak-
ing very naturally, a north-westerly course, and the Gulf system, bearing quite
as generally to the north-east, thus convei'ging upon East Tennessee. It Avas
therefore determined by the City of Cincinnati, after a full investigation in the
summer of 1869, to build a Trunk Line of Kailroad from this city to Chat-
tanooga, in order to make connections with both of these systems of railroads
and open up as much of the interior Southern Country as possible by
any single line of road, and reach both the Sea-board and Gulf by direct routes.
The General Assembly of the State of Ohio, on the 4th of May, 1869, passed
an act authorizing the construction of a railway by the city, through a Board
of Trustees, between two termini, one of which should be Cincinnati, the other
to be named by the City Council, which designated Chattanooga. Said trustees
were empowered to borrow a fund for the purpose, and to issue bonds therefor,
in the name of the city, not to exceed ten millions of dollars, Avith ample power
as to the time and place of payment. Said bonds to be secured by a mortgage
on the line of railway and its net income, and by a pledge of the faith of the
city, and a tax, which it is made the duty of the City Council to levy annually,
sufficient with its net income to pay the interest and provide a sinking fund for
the final redemption of its bonds. A provision of the act above named, required
that the question of constructing the railway and the issue of bonds for the
purpose, should be submitted to the qualified electors of the city, and that a
majority should decide. In conformity, a special election was held on the 26th
of June, 1869, whereat were cast 15,435 ballots in favor of providing said line
of railway on the part of the city, and 1,500 ballots against providing the
same. This heavy majority bore testimony to the enterprise and daring spirit
characteristics of our Queen City. At a subsequent election, the Trustees
were authorized to increase the issue of bonds to sixteen millions, so that the
total municipal debt, authorized and incurred, for the construction of the Cin-
cinnati Southern Railroad, is $16,000,000— and was created by the issue of city
bonds as follows :

SEVEN PER-CENT CURRENCY COUPON.

500 of $1000 each, $500,000

400 " 500 " - - - 200,000

Total $700,000



CINCINNATI ADVERTISEMENT.



^^\S B. FOtc^^



V



DESIGNER AND



Eng'raver on Wood,*

RELIEF PLATE MAP ENGRAVER.
No. 35 Arcade. CINCINNATI, OHIO.



BOOK ILLUSTRATIONS,

PORTRAITS.

Landscapes, Views of Buildings,

STOVJE CXJXS,



FOR EVERY BRANCH OF BUSINESS.

Parties out of the City not able to procure
Drawings, by sending good Photographs
will answer every purpose.

Particular attention given to making
accurate Drawings of Machinery of every
description.



APS.

Outline Sketches^

DIAGRAMS,

SHOW GAUDS,

Labels in Colors,

Patent Office Drawings,

Fac-similes ©f Penmanship engraved by
the Wax Process.



mTR0DUCT:0R7. s

These bonds are dated July 1st, 1S72, payable in thirty years— July 1st,
1902 at the American National Bank, New York, Interest Coupons, seven per
cent, payable at the same place, semi-annually, on 1st day of January and
July.

SEVEN THREE-TENTH PER-CENT CURRENCY COUPON.

$12,100,000 of 81,000 each, $12,100,000. Of these bonds $9,300,000 are
dated July 1st, 1872, payable in thirty years, t. g.— July 1st, 1902, at the Ameri-
can Exchange National Bank, New York. Interest Coupons (7 3-10 per cent,)
payable at same place, semi-annually, on 1st day of January and July.
$2,800,000, are dated May 1st, 187G, payable in thirty years, i. e.— May 1st, 1906,
at same bank. Interest Coupons, (7 3-10 per cent,) payable at same place,
semi annually, on 1st day of May and November.

SIX PER-CENT GOLD COUPONS.

$3,200,000, of $1000 each, American Gold or £200 sterling— rating .$.5.00
gold to each £1 sterling. These bonds are dated May 1st, 1876, and payable in
thirty years, x. e. — May 1st, 1906, at American Exchange National Bank, New
York, or in London, England. Interest Coupons, (6 per cent, each $30.00,
American Gold, or £6 sterling,) payable semi annually, at either of said places
on 1st day of May and November.

The ready sale of these bonds above par, showed the good standing of our
credit both at home and abroad.

Agreeable to one of the provisions of the "Act of 1869," and the election
of June, 26, 1869, the Superior Court of Cincinnati, appointed Richard M.
Bishop, Edward A. Ferguson, Miles Greenwood, Philip Heidelbach and William
Hooper, to be Trustees of the Cincinnati Southern Railroad, with the powers
given in the act aforesaid, and ordered that the said Trustees severally enter
into bond to the city of Cincinnati, in the sum of one hundred thousand dollars
with four sureties each, to be approved by the Court, conditioned for the
faithful discharge of their duties. (June 30th, 1869.)

On the third day of July, 1869, the Trustees of the Cincinnati Southern
Railway presented their said bonds with the following named persons:

1. — As sureties for Richard M. Bishop, as Trustee aforesaid ; Carlos H. Gould,
William S. Dickinson, James A. Frazer and Wm. Glenn.

2. — As sureties for Edward A. Ferguson, as Trustee aforesaid; Charles W.
West, Anthony D. Bullock, Henry Lewis, and John SchifF.

3. — As sureties for Miles Greenwood, as Trustee aforesaid ; Robert Mitchell
Lewis Worthington, William Woods, Joseph C. Butler and Peter Gibson.

4. — As sureties for Philip Heidelbach, as Trustee aforesaid; Jacob Seasono-ood
Jacob Elsas, Abram Akerland, and Samuel Thorner.

5. — As sureties for William Hooper, as Trustee aforesaid ; Learner B.
Harrison, Leverett G. E. Stone, David H. Taylor, and Thomas R. Biff^s.

These bonds were all approved by the Court and deposited with" the city
Treasurer. After which the said Trustees appeared in open court, and were duly
sworn to discharge their duties as Trustees as aforesaid.

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD.

The Trustees met on the 6th of July, 1869, and chose Miles Greenwood,
President, and appointed^Henry H. Tatem, Secretary. They ordered that
their office be kept at the rooms of the Board of trade of Cincinnati, in Pike's
Opera House Building, and that their regular meetings be held on the first



mmmAmm^^



CINCINNATI ADVERTISEMENTS.



STRAIGHT, DEMIM & CO.,

General Commission Merchants,

.A.IsriD

WHOLESALE GROCERS.

LE AIDINGr SI'ECI AIL.T1ES :

i_.oTJisi:.A.]xr.A.

STTCAR, MOLASSBS <& KZCE.

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN

Cheese, Seeds, Cranberries, Dried Fruit, Butter, &e.

]\o. 44 Vine Street, Ciiiciiiiiati, Ohio.

Matchless in Tone ! Incomparable in Workmanship I

Decker Brothers' Pianos,

GRAND, SQUAEE AND UPRIGHT.

ARE NOW OFFEE- WJL^^I^ilMlmS^^^ S^^ Jj^ ADMITTED BY
ED AT THE LOWEST wK ^^l^^^ THE MOST EMI-

PRICE CONSISTENT Wt^ - ^ ''^ y ^^ -^I^^SS N E N T MUSICIANS
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"""""" i!i'';[[-







INTRODUCTION.



Tuesday of each month, at 3 o'clock p. m. The office was subsequently removed
to No. '70, West Third street, Cincinnati, where was also established the Engi-
neer's office, and that of Secretary, Auditor, and everything pertaining to the
road, with the exception of the attorneys.

Instead of giving a lengthy and tedious account of the construction of the
"Southern Railway," we will give a few of the more important events connected
therewith.

The Board of Trustees first appointed William A. Gunn, as Chief Engineer,
who Avas afterward superseded by Thomas D. Lovett, who was followed by G.
Bouscaren the present engineer.

Since the beginning of the work of construction, December 12th, 1873, when
the first contract for the grading and masonry of Sections 57 and 58, Division
D, was awarded, including King's Mountain Tunnel. 253 contracts have been
awarded by the Board of Trustees. With a very few exceptions, they are now
all completed, (Dec, 1, 1877,) giving the following result:

The grading and masonry from Cincinnati to Boyce's Station, five miles east
of Chattanooga, a distance of 331 3-10 miles, has been finished, including 27
tunnels, aggregating in length 4.99-100 miles. 7,722 lineal feet of wooden trestle
work, 648 lineal feet of wooden bridges, 1,745 lineal feet of wooden highway
bridges, 6,165 lineal feet of iron viaducts, and 5,305 lineal feet of iron bridges,
including the structures over the Ohio, the Kentucky, and the Cumberland
rivers, have been built.

Five spans of the Tennessee river bridge are erected, and the others in pro-
gress of manufacture. An inclined plane to the Ohio river, at Ludlow, has
been built.

161 miles of main track and over fifteen miles of siding have been laid, and


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