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NUARY

1945






Cofolin is color gem-like color, rising to
its fullest surface expression from bottom-
less depths.

It is this about Catolin that inspires the
jewelry designer. No other material brings
him so close to the ruby, emerald, sap-
phire or topaz. Catalin is exquisite - is
imbued with the fire and highlights found
only in minerals and semi-precious stones.



And no other material responds so
readily to the jeweler's craft. Catalin, in
sheets, rods, tubes or custom castings can
be machined as easily as brass or wood
on ordinary shop equipment.

The tremendous acceptance Catalin and
Loalin' have already won in beauty's
field is still but a prelude - the real
applause is yet to come, and shortly.
In that we are certain they can prove
helpful, the members of Catalin's staff
invite the opportunity to plan now with
manufacturers and product designers.



CATALIN CORPORATION ONE PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK 16, N. Y.

CAST 8ESINS 'MOLDING COMPOUNDS UOUID RESINS
Cililm ind Loilm an Rejisttied Iftdeiwks




H-P-M INJECTION MACHINES

Are Engineered to Meet AH
Production Molding Requirements




Molders who have employed H-P-M
"All-Hydraulic" injection machines
during this busy wartime period
know that H-P-M machines are de-
signed for continuous, 74-hour-a-
day production. There are many
reasons why, but here are two which
are Important:

I. H-P-M injection machines are de-
signed and built by a pioneer
builder, with 14 years injection
machine experience, and 68
years experience in building
hydraulic machinery.



2. Injection machines are dependent
upon their hydraulic components
pumps, valves, controls. Each of
these units is designed and built
by H-P-M. This unity of origin and
manufacture of both operating
equipment and machine not only
assure coordinated functioning,
but also undivided responsibility
to the user.

H-P-M injection machines will solve
your molding problems. There is a
size for every production require-
ment. Write today for details.




THE HYDRAULIC PRESS MFG. CO.
Mount Gilead, Ohio, U. S. A.

BfincS Officw Nw York. fh.Ud.lp>.;. D.troit. CV.C.qo

R*prMfttat!vl in Principal Citil

VUhHr**<" H-r-M C.










'SOLO



ADAPTABILITY

...used to doing
the unusual



Does some part of the product you
make present an unusual problem?
You are under no obligation when
you ask our consultant service for
help. Our engineering thinking and
our machines are both adapted to
doing the unusual. And chances are
that a cold-forged part will be more
economical for you.



This Decimal Equiva-
lents trail chart is accu-
rate to four places and
signalled in three colors.
Yours at no cost or obli-
gation. Just send us your
name, title and address.



- S- - 5-
"1=



See our Catalog in
Sweet's File for Product
Designers.



JOHN NASSAU, INC.

Specialists in Cold-Forging Since 1850

160 Clay Street, Brooklyn 22, N. Y.



SPECIAL NOUS SIViTS SCR!



Hassall







CjiO N T E N T S

JANUARY 1945 VOLUME 2 NUMBER I

FEATURES

Designing for Plastics W. B. Petrold 21

Plasticizers Their Use and Limitations Leonard F. Pinto 24

Improved Techniques for Band-Sawing

Pla$t!cs H. J. Chamberland 30

Testing Aids Product Development J. R. Tucker 34

Plastics for Terrazzo Flooring Hendry L. Bart 36

Vinylite for Cable Coverings 33

The Silicones A New Plastics Family 40

Nameplates for War and Post-War B. W. Reich 46

Plastics Ride the Rails Kenneth R. Porter 48

Plastics as Teaching Aids Gilbert C. Close 52

Practical Aspects of Radio Frequency Pre-

Heating Charles H. Franh 56

Shaping Plastics with Formrite Tools F. C. Gladeck, Jr. 60

Standardizing Plastics 66

Highlights of the SPI Fall Conference William Schack 72

DEPARTMENTS



Plastics in Perspective 16

On the Drafting Board 55

Plastics at Work 68

Capital Report 84

Engineering News Letter.... 85



Industry Highlights 88

People 92

What's New in Plastics?.... 95
Literature Review 99

Association Activities 1 1



Plastics Overseas 102

FRONT COVER: Drilling operation to relieve the sprue in
an Injection molding machine at Hopp Press, Inc., New York



B. 6. DAVIS

General Manager



WILLIAM SCHACK
East Coas< Editor

DAVID GOODMAN
Associate Editor

HERMAN R. BOLLIN
Art Director



WILLIAM 1. ZIFF
Publisher



C. R. TI6HE

Assistant to Publisher



MICHAEL H. FROELICH
Editor

GAITHER LITTRELL
West Coast Editor

HARRY McCORMACK

Technical Editor

H. J. MORGANROTH

Production Director

GEORGE 8ERNER
Advertising Director



FRED HAMLIN

Washington Editor

FRANK ROSS
Staff Photographer

H. G. STRONG

Circulation Director



COPYRIGHT 1945

ZIFF-DAVIS PUBLISHING COMPANY
Editorial Offices. 540 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago II. III.

PLASTICS ll published monthly by Zlff-Oavls Publishing Company. 540 N. Michigan
Ave.. Chicago II. III. Eastern Advertising Manager, James Cerbone. Empire state
Bldg., New York I. N. Y. Roy E. Llnder. Midwest Advertising Manager, 540 N. Mich-
igan Ave.. Chicago II, III. Western Advertising Manager, William L. Plnney. 815 S.
Hill St., Los Angeles 14. Calif. Canadian Advertising Representative, G. J. McGoey,
21 King St., East, Toronto. London Advertising Representative, J. Forecast, Newspaper
Representations. Ltd., 231-232 Strand, London, W. C. 2. Washington, D. C. Office. Int'l
Building. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In U. S.. Mexico, South and Central America,
and (J. S. Possessions, 12 issues, S5.00: 24 issues. $8.00; In Canada. 12 issues, $5.50:
24 issues, $9.00: In British Empire, 12 issues, $6.00. All other foreign tountrlos. 12
issues. $8.00. Subscribers should allow two weeks for change of address. Address all
subscription letters to the Director of Circulation, PLASTICS. 540 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago II. III. Entered at Chicago, Illinois post office under Regulation 573: acceptance
under the act of June 5, 1934: authorized May 12. 1944. Contributors should retain copy
of contributions. All submitted material must contain return postage. Contributions
ill be handled with reasonable care, but this magazine assumes no responsibility for
their safety. Accepted material is subject to adaptations and revisions to meet editorial
requirements. Payment covers all authors', contributors' and contestants' rights, title,
and Interest in and to the material accepted and will be made at our current rates upon
acceptance. All photos and drawings are considered part of material purchased.




Simple Lay-Dps Cure
to Complicated Shapes . . .




Whether you use fluid pressure, high pressure, flash or
transfer molds, CO-RO-LITE* the ready-to-mold thermo-
setting compound will give you compound curves, deep
draws, angles, channels and large shells with marked
economy in preparation, lay-up and curing time. No matter
what the shape or size of the piece, CO-ROUTE'S long,
resilient rope fibres assure continuous, interlocking re-en-
forcement in every part of the molding. Re-enforcement so
light and so tough that it imparts great impact, flexural,
compressive and tensile strength in a wide range of densities
comparable to wood.

Let our technical experts and industrial de-
signers help you. CO-RO-LITE* provides valu-
able physical, chemical, design and pilot-plant
service. Just tell us your problem and we'll go to
work on it. Write today for our latest engineering
and manufacturing handbook giving the proper-



*Proffn patented:
rfffistered in V. S



trademark
. I'al. Off.



ties, requirements and advantages of Co-Ro-Lite*.




COLUMBIAN ROPE COMPANY

AUBURN, "The Cordage City," N. Y.



Canadian Licensee, Canadian Bridge Engineering Company Ltd.,
Box 157, Wolkcrville, Ontario, Canada



JANUARY 1945



PLASTICS




(Can you name the plastic part*
of this "cow"? See chart In- Inn:



How to milk more efficiency out of your product



No need to beef over the prob-
lem of bringing out a new product
or improving an old one. Conti-
nental's Plastics Division, uiili
years of experience in planning and
producing a wide variety of suc-
cessful plastic products, can give
you a good steer.

Our designers, engineers and re-
search men are in close touch with
the foremost manufacturers of raw
materials, and will work with them
to select the plastic best fitted for
your requirements.*



No matter which modern fabri-
cating techniques your product
requires compression, injection,
extrusion, lamination or sheet form-
ing it will be handled in the most
efficient and economical way.

You can count on Continental to
give your product the exact fea-
tures it should have beauty, dura-
bility, lightness, toughness or any-
thing else. You'll find an alert, pro-
gressive organization equipped to
offer sound, practical advice and
assistance at all times!




CAN COMPANY, INC.

HEADOUARTERS: Cambridge, Ohio

Sales Representatives In all
Principal Cities,



COMPRESSION- INJECTION EXTRUSION
SHEET FORMING LAMINATION




(o) Air scoop mounting compression; (b) Battery cose injec-
tion; (c) Dust cover sheet formed; (d) Mouthpiece for phone
compression; (e) Gunner's handles compression; (f) Nursery
dish compression; (g) Flashlight I enses injection; (h) Electrical
cap^-compression; (i) Power switch lever compression; (j)
Ribbon cover compression; (k) Trigger for gun handle com-
pression; (I) Distributor cap compression.



*To give you the best in plastics service, Continental has
acquired Reynolds Molded Plastics of Cambridge, Ohio. The
facilities of this pioneer organization combined with Conti-
nental's extensive resources form a Plastics Division capable
of designing, engineering and producing the widest range of
plastic products for manufacturers and designers.



PLASTICS



JANUARY 1945



Thinner than a fairy's wing
.yet adds can't hurt it!

'f



.










m



With C7BOI1 it's the combination of properties that counts



'"T'HAT flexible plastic film in the picture is 4/1000
JL of an inch thick. Yet it remains unaffected even by
nitric acid. That's because it's made from one of the
GEONS, a new group of polyvinyl materials whose
long list of unusual properties includes resistance to
acids and other corrosive chemicals.

But one property is important chiefly in its relation-
ship to other properties. That's why we say, with
GEON it's the combination of properties that counts.
Examine this list. Try to imagine the thousands of com-
binations that can be obtained from it.

Products of GEON can be made resistant to water,
oil, grease, acids, alkalies, sunlight, cold, heat, aging,




air, ozone, abrasion, flame, mildew, creasing and many
others. They may be permanently flexible, waterproof,
light weight, odorless, tasteless. They can be made in
a wide range of colors. And they can be heat sealed.

GEON can be extruded, pressure or injection mold-
ed. It can be calendered or cast into sheet or film. It
may be used as a coating for textiles and papers of all
kinds. Its almost limitless applications extend into the
plastics, packaging, textile, food, rubber, paper, cloth-
ing, shoe and many other fields. Probably many of its
most important applications have yet to be developed.

Right now all the GEONS are subject to allocation
by the War Production Board. Limited quantities may
be had for experiment. And our development staff and
laboratory facilities are available to help you work out
any special problem or applications. For more com-
plete information write Department UU-1, Chemical
Division, The B. F. Goodrich Company, 324 Rose
Building, E. Ninth and Prospect, Cleveland 15, Ohio.

CHEMICAL DIVISION

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY

IOSI BUILDING, I. NINTH * PIOSMCT, CLIVILAND IS, OHIO



JANUARY 1945



PLASTICS



"TH/S AD Wilt
S A KHOCK-OlfT"



But We'll Have
To Hold It 'Til
After tke War"




Remember? A bake shop full of good things . . .
Two small fry with their noses flat against the window?
Clutched in their grimy fists a couple of priceless pennies,
Eyes as big as saucers, thinking of what they could do
If they could only be turned loose among trie cakes?



Well, that's us roughly speaking, very roughly.
Civilian business flooding the market,
Luscious items offered almost hourly,
Afraid our competitors will outsmart us.



No, Mr. Copyrighter, Hold That Ad.
We're grown up now and part of a nation at war.
If all we had to worry about was our own
Stomach-ache we might take a chance.



Unfortunately, it's a national stomach-ache
We are staving off.
No civilian ads for the duration . . .
But . . . we'll send you a Ready Reference for Plastics
If you write us on your letterhead . . .
And hope you'll welcome us After the War.
V-E and V-J R.I.P.





BOONTON MOLDING COMPANY

MOLDERS, BY MOST ALL METHODS. OF MOST ALL PLASTICS
BOONTON - NEW JERSEY Tel. Boonton 8-2020



NEW YORK



Chanm Bldg.. 122 East 42nd Street. New York 17. N. Y.. MUrray Hill 6-8540



PLASTICS



JANUARY 1945




They said it couldn't be done but the Kuhn
& Jacob Molding & Tool Company of Trenton,
New Jersey did it ... with Megatherm!

All previous attempts to compression-mold this
heater-coupling with ordinary methods of pre-
form beating, had resulted in rejection ratios as
lii^li as 99 to 1. Because of its large size, irregular
shape, and variable thickness, it posed a difficult
production problem.

But i In- high-speed uniform heating of the
rag-filled resin-bonded preform with
Mcgatherm electronic heat resulted in




flawless finished couplings with a smooth surface
and minimum flash that passed rigid inspection
tests 100%.

Here is another proof that Megatherm can do
the job better . . . not only in production
problems involving large parts, irregular shapes,
and variable thicknesses, but in run-of-the-mill
operations.

And as a result, more and more plastic pro-
cessors are installing Megatherm . . . the
modern tool for modern industry. Get tin-
story on Megatherm now.



^a m

Federal Telephone and Radio^brporatiort



Re. IT. S. P.I.



INDUSTRIAL ELECTS



DIVISION




JAM ARY 1915



PLASTICS



Up-to-date
ANSWERS

TO YOUR

Plastic Problems




The whirlwind progress in plastics poses some
problems for the user, or the prospective user.
Materials and processes for telephone parts differ
vastly from those used on bicycles . . . and a
handle for an iron calls for different characteristics
than demanded by a water flask for a soldier.

This is where experience counts, and the right
equipment to turn out the parts accurately
and economically. At General Industries, we have
both. And we keep up to date in our engineering
and with our machinery.

That's why it might be wise for you to consult
with General Industries if you have a problem
in plastics. We don't pretend to know all there is
to know about plastics; but we believe we have, in
our group of men, enough combined experience
and initiative to meet any molding problem that
can be met and some that other folks feel might
be impossible.

Our capacity for service is extensive. We are
one of the really LARGE CAPACITY MOLDERS
in the country. That means we can handle



large moldings as well as smaller ones. We do
compression, transfer and injection molding, in all
plastic materials moldable by these processes.

We prefer to make our own molds and assume
complete responsibility for the quality of the
work, as well as for its prompt delivery.

We'll be glad to discuss the use of molded
plastics for your products or parts. There's a
wealth of experience here that you can call on,
and get prompt and reliable answers. No obliga-
tion, of course.



THE




MOLDED I PLASTICS



Molded Plastics Division



Chicago: Phone Central 8431
Detroit: Phone Madison 214S



Elyria, Ohio

Milwaukee: Phone Daly 6818
Philadelphia: Phone Camden 2215



PLASTICS



JANUARY 1945





FOR YOUR PLASTIC FABRICATING-



A new world of products for better living is in the making. With its
enlarged facilities for fabricating, forming and drawing of plastics, dura
will be ready to help you meet the demand for new and improved products.
Our war-time experience in production of cowlings, "dura" welded
cylinders, instrument dials, electronic, aviation and shipbuilding parts to
meet the most exacting specifications, will be at your service. This
experience will help you plan now for peace-time.

NOW IS THE TIME TO CONSULT DURA



dura plastics.



inc. 1 WEST 34 STREET. NEW YORK 1. N. Y.



Custom fabricafing specialists fo the aw'afion, electronic and shipbuilding industries.



J \MAKV 1945



PLASTICS



11




Do you use the hot-pin systems-just put a hat ptn
through the nearest directory? Do you select your
molder by his looks?

You probably don't do either. You probably look for
a molder who can give you some help in selecting a
material. One who can design a decent mold. One
who can mold your parts to fit your blueprints and
meet your schedules.

We think we can fill those requirements. We also have
the additional selling point of 3 complete and sep-
arately located plants to handle large national or small
local orders. Our name is Mack Molding Company. Our
plants are located at Wayne, New Jersey; Arlington,
Vermont; Waterloo, P. Q., Canada.




MOLDED
EXCELLENCE



12



SUES OFFICES Kf TIII cur. cncftti V onion. INOIIMMUS itsm ST .mis

PLASTICS



JANUARY 1945



ASSEMBLY OF







"""



peril.



UvC^ ' n he *^

caused by



XA/IDELY used prior to the war and now being used extensively on war
^ materials, "J" nuts will be in still greater demand for peacetime pro-
duction. For "J" nuts are a faster and more economical means for blind loca-
tion fastening. Quickly snapped by hand into screw-receiving position, they
do away with expensive welding, riveting, and staking. Their spring tension
lock assures a positive fastening that eliminates vibrafion loosening and
has sufficient resiliency to prevent damage to enamel, plastic or glass.

"J" type SPEED NUTS can be designed into your products ... let us show
you how they will simplify and speed up your assembly and reduce costs.
Send us your assembly details and we'll gladly rush samples.

TINNERMAN PRODUCTS, INC.

2127 FULTON ROAD, CLEVELAND 13, OHIO

In Canada: Wallace Bainei Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ontario
In England: Simmandi AtroctuorUt, Ltd., London





FASTEST



THING



I N



PAST



|.<. Mrt U S. r. OH.

E N I N C S



THE BASIC PRINCIPLE

of Spring -Tontion Lock ii
Embodied in all Spocd Nut Diigni



JAM ARY 1945



PLASTICS



13




RAINWEAR for soldiers ... or
WATERPROOFED FABRICS for the younger generation



There are practically no limits to the
versatility of our fabric coating fa-
cilities.

Today our plants are turning out
millions of yards of heavy duty fab-
rics, uniformly proofed against water
and many other fabric destroying
elements.

Tomorrow's production may be
yards of soft, non-allergic cottons
for sanitary sheetings or baby clothes
or thousands of yards of tough,
swanky simulated leather upholster-
ies or simply waterproofing, with
clear filmy plastics, dainty curtain
materials for a lady's shower.



You as a manufacturer may or may
not be interested in these particular
end uses yet they are but a few of
the future applications for plastic
coated fabrics in consumer goods
and industry.

Although much of our production
is still restricted to military and es-
sential civilian uses, the time may
not be far distant when it can be
safely diverted into domestic and in-
dustrial channels.

Plastic coatings are here to stay.
For hundreds of applications they
have been found superior to the pro-
tective materials for which they were



substituted after Pearl Harbor.

If your future manufacturing plans
call for fabrics or paper "proofed"
against such destructive elements as
acids, alkalies, oils, gases, water and
many others we would welcome the
opportunity of supplying your re-
quirements.

Samples of our current production
of plastic coated fabrics and papers
are available for your inspection.



Joanna




PLASTIC FABRICS DIVISION

The Western Shade Cloth Company, 22nd & Jefferson Streets, Chicago 16

Plastic Fabrics Division: VINYL RESIN, PYROXYLIN AND OTHER PLASTIC COATINGS PROOFED FABRICS AND PAPERS SIMULATED LEATHERS
Industrial Fabrics Division: RUBBER HOLLANDS VARNISHED SEPARATOR CLOTH BOOK CLOTHS AND OTHER SPECIALIZED FABRICS
Window Shade Divisions WINDOW SHADE CLOTH, ROLLERS AND ACCESSORIES CLOTH AND PAPER WINDOW SHADES

JOANNA TEXTILE MILLS, GOLDVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA



14



PLASTICS



JANUARY 1945




PI I pi OJJ Pure cotton flock of surpassing



cleanliness and uniformity.



FABRIFIL



Macerated cotton fabric for
extra strength.



CORDFIL



Evenly cut lengths of tire cord
for plastics of utmost strength.



It is not overstating to say that recent progress
in fillers has permitted plastics performance not
otherwise possible.

With a good working knowledge of fillers, the
designer has the right start. He can visualize in
terms of the possibilities of the three basic types
of Rayco Fillers: "Filfloc", "Fabrifil" and
"Cordfil", and can balance performance re-
quirements and cost limitations.

We offer wholehearted assistance in your study
of fillers at any stage, whether design, com-
pounding, or molding. The ability of fillers to
impart impact, tensile and flexural strength is



tremendously versatile, and we furnish innu-
merable varieties of our three basic types, in
order to suit each need EXACTLY. We invite
you to make fullest use of our experimental and
research resources, as well as our exception-
ally fine manufacturing facilities.



UTILIZE PLASTIC HELMET LINER SCRAP



Holders are continually finding new applications for
this low-priced molding compound ol the phenol
formaldehyde type. We bare a considerable supply
available. Prices promptly quoted.



of R.I.
INC.



RAYON PROCESSING CO.

45 TREMONT ST., CENTRAL FALLS, RHODE ISLAND

cuttt
&>tto*t ? MM,



OBTAIN COMPOUNDS CONTAINING RAYCO FILLERS FOR GOOD FLOW AND EXTRA STRENGTH



JAM'ARY 1 >r>



PLASTICS



15



M




SOMEWHERE about the crowded halls of the Wal-
dorf someone was heard praising the striking exhibit
of plastics which contributed so much toward making SPI's
Fall Conference such a success. That praise was well
earned, because the plastics products hung on the walls and
spread out on the tables showed forcefully how important
our industry is to the whole war effort. And to the experi-
enced eye, it permitted a glimpse into the peacetime future
to which we all are now looking so hopefully.

That exhibit was actually a monument to our industry
it was an entity we created and developed as our contribu-
tion toward winning the war. It was something real and
tangible; something we could see and point to with pride.
That's what made it so hard to believe that some of the
exhibitors wanted their products back again wanted, in
effect, to tear down the monument they had built and which
today is the only representative display of their war work.

We need a fine display such as we had at the Waldorf,
only let's make it a permanent one. Let's take George
Scribner's sound advice, and send it around the country
so everyone can see the kind of job we are doing; its
educational value cannot be measured by the mere intrinsic
worth of the individual items which make it up. Besides
which there is an intense desire for all kinds of informa-
tion about plastics a fact which can be well substantiated
by any public relations man of any plastics producing com-
pany, and by anyone who has anything to do with plastics
no matter how remote the connection. A permanent exhibit,
handled intelligently as it was at the Waldorf, would an-
swer many of the problems perplexing the public and in-
dustry.

George Scribner also touched off a sound idea when
he advocated an industry-sponsored show. Of course, he
was talking post-war, but it is pleasant to realize that
even at this time we have men progressive enough to
visualize what is best for the industry.

The SPI had a couple of other answers too. There is
the revised and expanded edition of the directory. And
there is the ingenious stunt Bill Cruse announced, by
which plastics plants will be helped in their publicity re-
leases to local newspapers. People always like to know
what is going on around them, especially in their home
town, and through these items they can learn something
about plastics generally. As a sample release, SPI dis-
tributed an account of the part plastics are playing in the



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